The Edge of the World

After staying overnight at Arthur’s River, on Tasmania’s northwest coast, and before making my way to Corinna, I was almost blown off the “Edge of the World”!!

beaches littered with logs at The Edge of the World, Tasmania

The Edge of the World is a wild and bleak place with relentless, grey-blue, angry waves, as evidenced by large amounts, and large-in-size, debris littering the beaches. It is beautiful to stand, feel and see the power and ruggedness of the ocean and its shores absorbing the constant mercilessness of it.

The view at The Edge of the Word, Gardiner Point, Tasmania

The ocean from this point to Argentina is the longest uninterrupted stretch of ocean on Earth. Inscribed on a stone plinth at the Edge is a poem written by tourism pioneer Brian Inder (Dec 1930- Aug 2019) describing the feeling of standing at this spot, being in awe of the surroundings, and reflecting that we are all little more than a speck in the spectrum of time.

Brian Inder is a well-admired in the Tasmanian northwest tourism industry, best known for founding Tasmazia & the Village of Lower Crackpot. https://www.tasmazia.com.au/ He was also pivotal in establishing Mural Fest, The Edge of the World and Mount Roland cableway.

The calmer side of the beach

This region is known as the Arthur-Pieman Conservation area. It was home to four Aboriginal clans: Peerapper, Monegin, Taskinener and Peternidic. We do not know how many people lived here before Europeans arrived. Within just 40 years, most tribal Aborigines died of European diseases while others were killed or exiled to Flinders Island.

The largest middens are in the northwest of Tasmania. Aboriginal shell middens are distinctive mounds that contain a rich history of past Aboriginal hunting, gathering and food processing activities. Discarded shells and bone, botanical remains, ash and charcoal tell the story that the Aboriginal feasted on different type of shellfish and seabirds. The women gathered shellfish and food plants, dived for abalone, lobster and were experts at hunting seals. They dug themselves hiding spots in the cobble beaches, where they hid and waited until they saw the opportunity to pounce on an unsuspecting seal and clubbed it to death. In the early 1800s, some European sealers and whalers took Aboriginal women to help them catch seals. Some of today’s Tasmanian Aborigines have descended from these women’s relations with the sealers and whalers.

At the viewing platform there are informative information plaques

There were many little birds darting around in the bushes along the path back to the car park.

A male Superb fairy-wren
Resting place for displaced logs at the Edge of the World, Tasmania

Thank you for visiting.

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