A Different Door

A walk around the neighbourhood, with the specific goal of photographing different coloured doors, delivered a surprising revelation. It is true that there are more conservatively coloured doors in my neighbourhood, predominantly cream or wood colour, but I was surprised at how many people have stepped out of the conservative door mind-frame and have dared to be a bit risqué.

I spotted yellow, dark grey, grey, cream and burgandy, lime green, red, orange-red and more coloured doors.

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My cream coloured door
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My quick sketch of a rather dull entrance

My door is a cream colour and I’ve always wanted a red door. Apparently in early America, red doors were a sign of welcome to passing horses and buggy travellers, and a sign of a safe house on the Underground Railroad. Also, it is said that vibrant red doors reflect vibrancy, liveliness and excitement inside the house.

The quarantine measures have spurred me into a clean-up and re-organising mode, like many people have been using this time to do long awaited jobs around the house, and while the momentum was still present…. Ta-da! I now have a red door!

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My newly painted red door 🙂
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my sketch of a more vibrant and welcoming entry

Do you have a different coloured door? I’d love it if you would email me a photo of it (pjpaintings@gmail.com) and I will add it to this blog post. It can be a living and breathing door-photo collecting vessel!

Thanks for stopping by.

Take care and be safe, from PJ Paintings

Pommes de terrible!

The COVID-19 pandemic’s impacts are far-reaching. The Belgian’s potato (pommes de terre) industry is facing having 750,000+ tons of excess potatoes. For the good of the economy, Belgians are pledging to eat more frites (french fries – which, by and by, the Belgian’s invented). The Belgian government is asking its people to eat frites twice a week, in a bid to help save their farmers, and potatoes, from a dire fate.

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A global food glut, due to disrupted export channels has emerged, giving rise to citizens being admonished to take up a new patriotic duty, “agro-patriotism” – shovelling down national leftovers.

Trade groups in France are pleading its citizens to eat more cheese, United States and Canada, to eat more potatoes and zucchinis, and similar scenarios are unfolding around the world. No longer should you be asking what you can do for your country, but what can you “eat” for your country. So, go on and have a second serving tonight!

My lunch today – Potato Fritters

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Take care from PjPaintings

What a Contrast!!!

One good thing that is coming out of the time in Quarantine, is that I’m getting stuck into tidying and re-organising my house – big time!

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Building shelves for my art work-room
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A corner of my art work-room before the tidy-up
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The same corner after the tidy. What a contrast!!

During my intensive tidy up, I have found forgotten and not-forgotten pieces of artwork.

These were forgotten pieces that I painted about five years ago.

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“Heartbroken” – This card is available by emailing pjpaintings@gmail.com

I’ve often wondered why Sympathy cards overwhelmingly picture fields of flowers, a beach or ocean scene, a fence with the sun setting over the hills and the like? These images don’t reflect or acknowledge the pain that many people feel at terrible times in their lives. I understand that the images are trying to help a person to focus on the “the half-full glass” but I sometimes think that an image like “Heartbroken” can help somebody feel that the sender of the card understands the pain and emptiness that they are feeling right now and their immense grief during the early weeks, months, and years they are living with.

I’d be really interested in hearing what you think of this, or am I odd?? Would you send a “Heartbroken” card? Would you like or prefer a card like this over traditional imaged sympathy cards if you suffered a loss? (which I really hope you haven’t or don’t).

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This one I titled “Heartache” and it is also available as a card via pjpaintings@gmail.com

I’ve tried to research this topic but I have found very little about it or explanations about the reason behind the image choices of Sympathy cards. Apparently there are cultural differences with grief. I read an article that has studied differences between how Germany and United States respond to grief. According to this text, American culture encourages people to avoid negative emotions more than the German culture. American expressions of sympathy focus less on the negative and more on the positive than the Germans.

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I named this drawing “Broken Hearted”

I hope that your heart is happy and healthy.

Take care and thank you for visiting, from Pj Paintings

http://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade    pjpaintings@gmail.com

It’s Growing!!!

During the first week of February, my washing machine filled the basement with water, instead of the washing machine. Yesterday, the final step of the restoration took place. I woke up early, too excited to sleep, because I could finally restore my art room.

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My desk in my empty art room

Unfortunately, the carpet was still damp and my art room had to wait. So, I turned my attention to my toilet room, which is a small, narrow space (and difficult space to photograph walls in!). Last year, I started hanging some of my black & white drawings (and two bear pictures from a Canadian Artist, which unfortunately I’ve forgotten their name) in my toilet room.

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My wall in the toilet room.

My goal is similar to my succulent garden, where I want my plants to spread so it becomes a solid carpet of succulents and no dirt is showing, I’d like this wall to feature mainly my ink drawings from floor to ceiling – the entire wall.

I added four Pj Paintings drawings today. It’s starting to evolve into an Australian/Canadian wall. That wasn’t the initial plan but I’m happy with this morphing.

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The left side of the group of pictures
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The right side of the group of pictures
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Centre view of the group of pictures

I have others that I could add but I’ve decided that I’ll save them for the market. I really like my little echidna (I feel very immodest when I say that).

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A quick and loose drawing of an echidna

I also like my Zebra Finches but the red beaks don’t fit the lack of colour theme.

What projects are you undertaking during the lock down? I’d love to hear!

Stay home & stay safe everybody.

Thanks for visiting.

Coffee Table Feature

A miniature one of these would be cool to have on a coffee table. This art producing machine is wind generated.

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Windmill at MONA (Museum of Old & New Art) in Tasmania

The windmill turns , which in turn, turns some wheels, which in turn moves the Artline pen in a circular motion and turns the turntable which moves the paper very slowly along.

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Wind powered drawing at MONA (Museum of Old & New Art) in Tasmania

The windier the day the darker and denser the drawing is. A pen a day is used and the roll of paper lasts two weeks before the piece of art is finished.

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Pen at Work

It is quite mesmerizing and relaxing to watch, which is why I think it would be a great coffee table feature, and not to mention, a conversation starter.

Thank for stopping by. Keep your pens moving and producing art. 🙂

Before & After shot

The Inktober Challenge for 2019, involving drawing a picture with some form of ink each day of the month of October from a prompt list provided, produced a variety of artwork. Here are some before and after shots of some of the drawings I did for the challenge.

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Fragile
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Fragile
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For the prompt word was ‘husky’ I drew a “Husky Wombat”
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Husky Wombat 
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For the prompt word ‘overgrown’ I drew an emu who has outgrown his bed!
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Out grown
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For the prompt word ‘dark’ I drew a touching moment between an emu and a twinkling star
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Dark

Which do you prefer, before or after paint is added?

Thanks for stopping by.

PJ Paintings/Patricia Hopwood-Wade

 

 

More #Inktober2019 days

You’ve probably heard of “tip-toe through the tulips” well for Day 20 of the Inktober Challenge, I did “treading through the tulips” for the prompt word “tread”.

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Treading through the tulips!

Day 19 brings the word “sling”. I painted dad doing the school run. In the emu world the dad sits on the eggs for a month without eating, drinking or defecating and raises the chicks for the first 6 months of their lives.

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Sling

Day 21’s prompt word is “treasure”. Here’s my unfinished painting for treasure.

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What a treasure!

We’re nearing the end of Inktober. we’re almost into November. Yikes!

Hope the rest of month goes well for you. Thanks for visiting, from PJ Paintings

 

Gallery Duty

I did gallery duty today (Sunday) at Artefacts Gallery located in the Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania. After cleaning shelves, changing displays and pricing art work, I settled down behind the desk and got my paints out. There were very few people about, so painting some of my Inktober drawings seemed like it would be a good use of my time.

A couple from the mainland of Australia came in and he, in particular, was curious and asked me questions about my prints and then about what I was painting. I explained the Inktober Challenge to him, where we receive a prompt word for each day of the month.  I was painting the drawings for Day #10 “pattern” and Day #11 “snow”. He said he really liked “pattern” and asked me if he could buy it? “But, I haven’t finished painting it”, I said. He didn’t want anymore paint added to it. He liked it as it was. “Would you like me to paint the hat?” “No,” was his reply. “The boots?” “Nope”. So, it was pronounced – SOLD after I took a quick photo of it.

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finished or unfinished “pattern”

Has anyone else ever sold a painting before they consider it finished???

He left and returned a few minutes later asking if I could paint “snow” and they would come back in two hours for it. So, in between serving customers I painted. When they returned, they both said “wow” when they saw it and commented on how much difference colour made. Another Inktober drawing pronounced, SOLD. That’s six Inktober paintings in two days.

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Painting for the prompt word “snow”

Thanks for stopping by. Hope the upcoming week goes well for everyone. PJ Paintings

More Inktober days

For Inktober’s prompt word “dragon”, surprise-surprise, I drew a dragon (lol).

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Dragon Escape

For the prompt word “Ash” I drew emus bushwalking through an Eucalyptus regnans forest. These trees are commonly called Mountain Ash.

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the happy wanderers

The following prompt word for Day 14 of the Inktober Challenge is “overgrown”. Those of you have tall children can probably relate to this drawing. I have two tall sons and we had to cut away the end boards of their beds to accommodate their long legs!

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I hope you are enjoying Inktober as much as I am.  It certainly gets your creative juices flowing! Take care and thanks for stopping by, PJ Paintings.

http://www.pjpaintings.com

 

Snowing patterns

‘Pattern’ and ‘snow’ are the prompt words for Day 10 and 11 of the #Inktober2019 Challenge.

I have drawn this emu strutting confidently wearing her patterned coat.

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The Coat of Pattern

For the prompt word ‘snow’ I have taken my inspiration from childhood memories of making snow people. I grew up on the north shore of Vancouver on Seymour Mountain where winter brought snow. In Australia, snow is a novelty and many people have never seen or touched snow but if emus were to experience snow, I’m sure that they would build some snow people.

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Snow!!

Hope all is well in your neck of the woods. Thanks for visiting, PJ Paintings

http://www.pjpaintings.com