Painting Birds

I’m working on a new painting that has quite a few different birds congregating on the same branch.

Tasmania has twelve species of bird which are only found in Tasmania and a number of other species which are endemic at the subspecies level, such as the threatened wedge-tail eagle.

“Regal” – the wedge-tailed eagle
Quality, archival prints available at
https://pjpaintings.com/collections/birds

The Tasmanian nativehen and the yellow-throated honeyeater are endemic to Tasmania. The Tasmanian nativehen are a common sight along roadways. Luckily, they seem to be road savvy. I love their comical running style.

The Tasmanian nativehen
The yellow-throated honeyeater

There are also breeding endemics that breed only in Tasmania, such as the brightly coloured, endangered orange-bellied parrot.

The orange-bellied parrot

The tawny frogmouth is a species native to the Australian mainland and Tasmania and the Australian little penguin are only found in southern Australia and New Zealand .

The tawny frogmouth
The little penguin

The musk lorikeet, flame robin and beautiful firetail are endemic to south-eastern Australia. The flame robin does range to the Queensland border and into Tasmania, and the Beautiful firetail ranges to Newcastle, NSW, to Kangaroo Island, SA, but is most common in Tasmania.

The musk-lorikeet
The flame robin and beautiful firetail in the centre

An enchanted forest scene

Now how did a wombat sneak in!? They are endemic to Australia, including Tasmania, unlike the kookaburra, who are now found on plenty of branches in Tasmania having a good old laugh. They were introduced from the mainland of Australia by humans to try to reduce snake numbers. The first recorded release was in 1902.

I hope today delivers you some laughs.

Take care of yourself and keep an eye for the birds around you.

Cheers from Patricia (PJ)

http://www.pjpaintings.com

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Salamanca Market April 9, 2022

The first customers of the day had just returned from doing the Overland Track. https://www.taswalkingco.com.au/overland-track/ . They are visiting Tasmania from Rock Hampton, Queensland. They purchased “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”, “Hammock Life”, “Meet Me at the Gate” and “Maggie & Maggie” prints.

“Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”
“Hammock Life”
“Meet Me at the Gate”

A framed small original painting of a cute, seated wombat was purchased for a grandson’s bedroom on the Gold Coast.

A “Hanging Out” print is going to make its home in Melbourne with a lady from France, who has been living in Australia for ten years and is a French teacher.

“Hanging Out”

A young lady from Winnipeg, Canada, who is spending a year in Australia, bought some A-5 sized prints. Another young lady bought an A-5 sized print titled “Emu Boogie” for her piano playing sister that lives in New Zealand.

“Emu boogie!”

A lady from Arizona, USA, bought a “Lazy Days” tote bag. She’s visiting her son. She’s originally from Australia and has been living in United States for 20 years.

“Lazy Days” tote bag, washable and made in Australia. Available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags

A couple from Sydney purchased my newest print of my original painting titled, “Maggie & Maggie” and a “Tu-whit and Tu-whoo” print.

“Maggie & Maggie” my newest addition to the PJ Paintings collection. This print is squarish in dimensions and pairs up well with “Meet Me at the Gate” with the same dimensions. Quality prints are available at: https://pjpaintings.com/collections/birds?page=1

Three girlfriends discussed which emu they were on the “Salamanca Fresh” tote bag and bought one to use at the market. It went very well with her Australian designed, and made, colourful dress.

The fun and colourful “Salamanca Fresh” tote bag

Another couple ladies bought some cards, prints and an original painting of a platypus looking at a fish. I don’t have a photo of the Platypus painting but it was similar to this one except that they were looking at a fish instead of a turtle.

original platypus painting

Another small original painting sold too, which I titled “The Owl Look”.

“The Owl Look”

Thanks for visiting. Now to recuperate for next week (lol).

Until then, take care, and thanks for visiting my blog,

from PJ Paintings

at site 30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

Quality prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Salamanca Market April 2, 2022

It was a drizzly and breezy day, which was better than rainy and windy. 🙂

My very first visitors to the stall purchased two large “Salamanca Fresh” tote bags and a “Lazy Days” cushion, gifts for friends and one tote bag for her.

The popular “Salamanca Fresh” tote bag available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags
My painting “Lazy Days” available as a cushion cover at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/cards

A couple from Melbourne, who have a large pencil original drawing of twelve birds in their dining room and on their bookcase beside this picture, they have a collection of small black & white original pictures of birds. They bought my little fairy penguin drawing to join this collection. They saw Fairy Penguins on Bruny Island. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-20/how-to-see-little-penguins-in-tasmania/8197000 That is where I saw them for the first time but I reckon the best place to see them is at Stanley. That is a stand-out memory for me.

A quick Artline pen sketch of a Fairy Penguin

A lady, who used to live in Vancouver, living in Australia now, bought four small prints from the wombat in hammocks in series for her grandchild’s bedroom.

Grandparents from Ireland, visiting their son and family who lives in Deloraine, Tasmania, bought “Family Outing”. It is her son’s family with the three children in the back.

“Family Outing”

Some young people from Netherlands bought some greeting cards, some French men visited the stall and then some Belgians stopped in. I don’t often meet Belgians at the market. I heard them speaking French and asked them where they were from. They’ve been in Australia for 2.5 years and are flying back to Belgium in two weeks. Her favourite bird is the kookaburra so “Sitting on the Fence” will soon be embarking on a long trip to Belgium.

“Sitting on the Fence”

A sister bought a “Suspended” print for her brother and new baby and a young couple, down just for the weekend from Melbourne, purchased “Bunk Beds” and “Spiky Bunk Beds”.

My painting of echidnas in hammocks, titled “Spiky Bunk Beds”

A few originals have found new homes too: an urban sketch of a house in New Town, a Monarch butterfly, a moose, a whale on a spouting boat and “Spotted”. “Spotted” was purchased by a couple from the Blue Mountains, NSW https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/blue-mountains-national-park . Their daughter lives close by and there are magpies that visit her every day for a feed. She just loves watching the antics that the birds get up to.

“Spotted”

A lady from Pennsylvania, USA bought a “Helping Hands” and a wombat print. She has family that lives in Tasmania. She told me that she bought prints from me last time she was here and that visitors to her house frequently compliment and ask where she got the artwork from.

“Helping Hands”

Thanks for visiting.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

at site 30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

Quality prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Salamanca Market February 5, 2022

It doesn’t take long until I’m leaving for the market in semi-darkness again. Thankfully blue skies and sunshine soon made their presence.

The first visitors to the stall were a young couple from Brisbane. They saw several echidnas while exploring Tasmania and said they had a soft spot for them. Therefore, “Spiky Bunk Beds” was their chosen print.

Spiky Bunk Beds prints are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats

A couple visiting from Hervey Bay, Queensland, the whale capital of Australia he told me, bought an A-3 sized print of “Who, Who, Who are You? II”. Another couple from Adelaide and Sydney bought “Who, Who, Who are You? II” also. There are not many prints of this size left of this painting and the A-4 size limited edition print run ran out over a year ago. https://www.visitfrasercoast.com/why-hervey-bay-is-australias-whale-watching-capital/

Who, Who, Who are You? II

A couple from Sydney bought three prints “Spiky Bunk Beds”, “Hanging Out” and “House Sharing”. Another visitor from Sydney purchased a “Salamanca Saturdays” print and a lady also from Sydney purchased my original painting of a Flame Robin.

House Sharing
Flame Robin

A gallery that is representing me phoned me during the market to tell me that they sold the original painting of “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”. When they were visiting Tasmania, she bought a print of “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins” and when she got back to Sydney, she decided she just had to have the original painting. So, Goldilocks the Wombat, is going to make its home in Sydney.

Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins

Thank you for visiting and I wish you a great upcoming week.

Cheers from PJ Paintings

 at site 30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

Quality prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Success

I am basically a self-taught watercolour artist. About 12 years ago, I started taking evening Adult Ed classes, when I worked full-time. I have kept practicing and trying to improve my drawing and painting skills ever since.

I have submitted applications for local exhibitions, involving submitting a form, including a high-resolution gloss photograph when requested, and a non-refundable payment. I was so often rejected that I stopped applying. Unlike when you apply for a job, you can phone and ask why you weren’t asked to be interviewed and receive some constructive feedback. With the art application process, you usually aren’t allowed to engage with the judges, so you never find out if you were close to getting accepted, on the right track or are able to seek any kind of feedback to help you.

Rejection is discouraging and I think I briefly found myself skirting around the edges of Imposter Syndrome. Thankfully, for me, I focused on the people who do like and connect with my art, rather than those that don’t, and keep painting what I wanted to paint and I was able to avoid getting drawn into this misery. I can understand how Imposter Syndrome could easily suck you in and really damage your confidence.

I also think that my imagination helps me fight against this syndrome and negative art-self-talk because it is such a dominant and relentless force in my brain. It is always bombarding me with painting ideas. It produces way, way, way more ideas than I ever will be able to paint. So, I feel that my brain is forced to analyse, judge, sort and categorise painting ideas rather than dwell on “an internal experience of believing that you are not as competent as others perceive you to be”. This TED talk explains Imposter Syndrome or Imposter Phenomenon well https://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_cox_what_is_imposter_syndrome_and_how_can_you_combat_it?language=en and there are many articles explaining these commonly experienced feelings https://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud.

I realise that many people underestimate how challenging I find art and think that I can draw anything. Myth buster – there are many things that I simply can’t draw!!, which also could feed into Imposter Syndrome. I struggle with composition, drawing and I usually erase whatever I am trying to draw multiple times. I think if people watched me undertaking a painting from start to finish, that they would be seriously surprised. I am a serious believer that drawing can improve with practice. It is about enjoying trying (the journey), enjoying the end-products that are successful, trying to give as little time as possible to dwelling on those that aren’t, (after analysing them to try to avoid the same mistake/s next time) and enjoying the joy that art gives to the recipients.

A friend encouraged me to submit an application form to enter my painting, titled “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins” in the Waterways Exhibition to be held at the Long Gallery in the Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania. Reluctantly I did, and success! the painting has been accepted!!

Prints and tote bags of this painting are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

The Water Ways exhibition will open to the public at 10am on Friday 5th February at the Long Gallery, Salamanca Place, Tasmania and continues until Sunday 14th.

I hope that you are able to see the Water Ways exhibition and the original of “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ)

Fur Day

I’m still working on my painting titled “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”. Hopefully I’ll soon be able to announce it finished. It will be well worthy of some celebrating as I’ve spent many, many hours on it.

Today was a fur day. This is the way my finger looks when I’m painting fur.

Wiping excess paint off on my finger so the first stroke of fur is a fine line.

I’ve painted the fur grey, blue, burnt sienna, raw sienna, burnt umber, purple and mixed some of these colours together to create a smoother graduation of colours too. Each time I rinse and put paint on my 000 size paint brush, I wipe off the paint on my finger to ensure the first stroke isn’t too thick. As a consequence of removing most of the paint, I can only do about two or three strokes before I run out of paint on my brush and have to start the process again. It is a time consuming process!

A wombat getting furrier by the hour

I think the wombat is about done, except for the foot. I have to add more shadow. They have such gnarly, gorgeous feet for all the digging they do.

https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/fauna-of-tasmania/mammals/possums-kangaroos-and-wombats/wombat

wombats have gnarly, cute, pink back feet

I’m planning to get cracking on the penguins in the next couple of days and I look forward to showing you the finished painting. In the meantime, I hope that you are finding time to relax and rest in the busy lead up to the festive season.

Wishing you a safe festive week, from Patricia (PJ)

http://www.pjpaintings.com

Silent Disco

Silent discos are a rave that is growing in popularity.  Apparently it has been around for some time. I’ve only just recently heard about them.

Glastonbury Festival, UK, has been accredited with coming up with the idea. When new noise limiting laws were imposed, festival organisers were struggling to find a solution. The festival organiser’s daughter suggested silent disco headphones. Festival goers were given headphones when the noise curfew came into play, allowing the the revellers to continue their clubbing experience by having a silent rave. It also allowed people to hear and dance to music while others didn’t have to shout over the music if they wanted to talk to each other. 

In 2013, Silent Disco Walking Tours came into being. People are listening to the same playlist, plus hearing fun commentary from the tour guide. It’s about ‘flash mob dancing’, interpretative dancing and singing around local landmarks, keeping fit, community connection and fun. http://www.gurududu.org/silentdisco/

I painted two little penguins enjoying a silent disco on the far-flung ice shelves of Antarctica. Fairy penguins, also called little penguins or little blue penguins, are the smallest of the 17 penguin species. They are about 30 – 33 cm tall. 

                                    The drawing before I applied paint.

They come ashore in multiple locations on the island of Tasmania, where I live. I’ve seen them at many different beaches in Tasmania and I get just as excited and enchanted each time I see them. They are beautiful and precious creatures, as all creatures are.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-20/how-to-see-little-penguins-in-tasmania/8197000#:~:text=But%20the%20only%20species%20to,Tasmania%20and%20its%20islands%20home.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope that life is providing you with many things to dance about.

Prints of Silent Disco are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/musical/products/copy-of-emu-boogie-emu-watercolour