An Encounter with Police

During the Australia Day long weekend, I visited Stanley and Corinna, small towns on the northwest coast of Tasmania. We saw amazing things on our road trip, but all the sights seen were in the realm of what you would expect to see: animals, birds, spectacular scenery and the like.

one of the many cute cottages in Corinna, Tasmania

But things got a little different on the leg from Stanley to Corinna.

To get to Corinna from the Smithton direction, you drive on a 70 km stretch of unsealed road, full of potholes. The road is quite narrow and when a white ute was approaching, we pulled off to the side and stopped to let it pass. We were somewhat affronted that the driver didn’t make a thank you hand gesture and quickly made the judgment that they must not be local as this is Tasmanian behaviour and considered good manners. Sure enough, it was confirmed when we saw that the ute had a Queensland number plate.

We continued our slow drive, manoeuvring around potholes, avoiding one other car that passed us. About 10 km later, a dark ute passed us, flashed its lights and reversed. A policeman jumped out of his ute with his mobile phone showing us a photo and asking if we had seen this white ute with Queensland number plates? The officer asked us about three times if we were definitely certain we had seen the ute and we recounted him our encounter with this ill-mannered Queenslander. (It turned out he wasn’t from Queensland). Then the policeman started asking us tricky questions about where on the road this encounter took place and so on, but we told him we were too unfamiliar with the road to give him that kind of information. He took my name, address, registration and so on and then we parted ways.

We eventually arrived in beautiful Corinna, which has no internet, wifi, TV and so on. On my previous visit to Corinna, I did quite a bit of urban sketching, which you can see my drawings by clicking on this link https://wordpress.com/post/theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/5532 This time, I spent more time enjoying the natural surroundings of the Pieman River and went kayaking for the first time in my life.

The beautiful Pieman River, Corinna

Upon returning to civilization, we learned that the white ute with Queensland number plate, was actually a kidnapper! Apparently, he attempted to kidnap two children, but one escaped. It was reported that he had the kidnapped girl in the ute. Thankfully, the police did successfully capture him. Here are links to the incident. https://www.tasmaniatalks.com.au/newsroom/tasmanian-news/54934-attempted-child-abduction-sparks-hunt

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-01-25/tasmania-police-arrest-man-after-alleged-attempted-abduction/13088706

We couldn’t believe it that we saw, and drove by, a kidnapper!

Safe driving everybody and beware of ill-mannered drivers with foreign number plates.

Lover’s Falls, Corinna

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Trowutta What?!

This is the response you get from most people when you mention Trowutta Arch, even to Tasmanians who have lived on the north-west coast all their lives. It is mysteriously overlooked despite being a geological wonder.

The Trowutta Arch is a rare naturally occurring arch that was created by the collapse of a cave resulting in two sinkholes either side of the arch formation. One sinkhole filled in with soil and was eventually covered by trees and ferns, while the other filled with water.

Trowutta Arch

The water is a bright green, almost fluorescent. The colours and atmosphere make it feel quite surreal. The water-filled sinkhole is geomorphologically classified as a cenote – a steep walled water-filled sinkhole. The Trowutta Arch is considered one of the world’s best examples of a cenote. It is more than 20 metres deep and is an important habitat for invertebrates.

water filled sink hole – Trowutta Arch

Trowutta Arch is about 25 kilometres inland from Smithton in Tasmania’s far north west.  It’s a short, easy walk through spectacular rain forest to get to the arch. Along the way to the arch, I found the mirror image of the ferns’ dead and live fronds, visually very cool.

hour glass ferns

I love fern fronds. A few years ago, I went for a walk and took photos of lots of fronds. When I got home, I discovered that I took over 50 photos of fronds! I tried to use some restraint this time.

unfurling fronds

If you are visiting the north-west of Tasmania, it is well worth seeking out this gem.

a fern frond with the path to the arch in the background

Thanks for stopping by and I hope that the upcoming week serves you up many joyful moments.

Magical Corinna

I have been living in Tasmania for 25 years and have not properly explored the north west coast of the island and there are so many hidden gems! One being Corinna. All the accommodation in Corinna (it’s a popular destination!) was booked out weeks in advance, so I was only able to spend a day there. https://corinna.com.au/ It is a small, historical and isolated settlement (no wi-fi, petrol station, shops and the like) nestled along the Pieman River.

Corinna, once a thriving gold mining town, is rich with history and stories. Its ancient forests, originally housing Aboriginal hunter-gatherer society, now provides the backdrop to a largely undisturbed village as when the Europeans explored and prospected here.

After a long and bumpy drive from Arthur River, the first stop was the cafe, which is also the shop, accommodation reception, where you purchase barge ride tickets and more.

The one and only shop/cafe/reception and the like

From the window seat, I started to sketch the first cottage in view, which I later discovered was the Old Pub. I doesn’t look like what I imagine a pub would look like!

my sketch of the pub from the Corinna cafe
The Old Pub, Corinna Tasmania

Apparently it was quite a rowdy place!

After a meal, I started exploring Corinna on foot.

old petrol bowser
One of the many accommodation cottages
The Butcher Shop that is next door to the Old Pub
Another shot of the Butcher Shop. It has the coolest chimney!
The Butcher Shop. I’ve never seen a chimney like this one!
some of the characters and stories of Corinna
The Great Western. The whole time I was drawing this building, there was a pademelon chomping away. It’s difficult to see in the photo, but it is on our right side of the building, in the grass.
I drew in the pademelon at The Great Western, Corinna

We did an hour and a half walk in the beautiful Tarkine Rainforest and visited a patch where the crayfish burrow. There are boat cruises, canoeing and more adventures to be had in Corinna. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/regions-of-tasmania/west-coast/corinna

crayfish burrows

Then it was sadly time to depart, using the Fatman Barge transport novelty ($28 per car). It only fits two vehicles at a time on it, less if they are pulling a boat or trailer.

The only Stop sign in Corinna
Corinna humour
The barge coming to collect us
being transported across Pieman River. Bye-bye Corinna 😦

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you enjoyed the short tour of Corinna, Tasmania.

Cheers from Patricia Hopwood-Wade http://www.pjpaintings.com

More information about Corinna, Tasmania