Painting Birds

I’m working on a new painting that has quite a few different birds congregating on the same branch.

Tasmania has twelve species of bird which are only found in Tasmania and a number of other species which are endemic at the subspecies level, such as the threatened wedge-tail eagle.

“Regal” – the wedge-tailed eagle
Quality, archival prints available at
https://pjpaintings.com/collections/birds

The Tasmanian nativehen and the yellow-throated honeyeater are endemic to Tasmania. The Tasmanian nativehen are a common sight along roadways. Luckily, they seem to be road savvy. I love their comical running style.

The Tasmanian nativehen
The yellow-throated honeyeater

There are also breeding endemics that breed only in Tasmania, such as the brightly coloured, endangered orange-bellied parrot.

The orange-bellied parrot

The tawny frogmouth is a species native to the Australian mainland and Tasmania and the Australian little penguin are only found in southern Australia and New Zealand .

The tawny frogmouth
The little penguin

The musk lorikeet, flame robin and beautiful firetail are endemic to south-eastern Australia. The flame robin does range to the Queensland border and into Tasmania, and the Beautiful firetail ranges to Newcastle, NSW, to Kangaroo Island, SA, but is most common in Tasmania.

The musk-lorikeet
The flame robin and beautiful firetail in the centre

An enchanted forest scene

Now how did a wombat sneak in!? They are endemic to Australia, including Tasmania, unlike the kookaburra, who are now found on plenty of branches in Tasmania having a good old laugh. They were introduced from the mainland of Australia by humans to try to reduce snake numbers. The first recorded release was in 1902.

I hope today delivers you some laughs.

Take care of yourself and keep an eye for the birds around you.

Cheers from Patricia (PJ)

http://www.pjpaintings.com

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Commission works

I’m currently working on several commissions. This one involves painting a bunch of Australian animals and birds. One of the most often posed question I am asked is “how long did it take you to paint it?”. Discounting the drawing and all the decision-making time around composition, it is taking me between 2 to 3 hours per individual animal.

Australian scene

Here are some of the birds that have been painted in the above painting.

Musk Lorikeet
Fairy penguin
Yellow-throated honeyeaters

This is another commission painting that I’m working on. It is for a little girl’s birthday. The brief was to do something with an emu and wombat. Here’s what I came up with.

birthday painting in progress

Hopefully, I will be able to share the finished products with you soon.

Talk soon, Patricia (PJ)

Salamanca Market January 1, 2021

Happy New Year and may 2022 be a good year in all ways for you and your families.

Tasmania’s borders opened December 15th, therefore, there were more tourists from all around Australia at the market. Omicron has also come along with the opened borders, but I don’t see how it was possible to avoid that.

My first visitor to the stall was a lady from Perth, who went to Victoria for her granddaughter’s first birthday and then has spent 15 days in Tasmania to be hopefully allowed back into her state. States have changing and different rules. She is taking back with her, possibly back to Victoria if she’s not allowed back to her state, a “Home Among the Gum Trees” print.

Home Among the Gum Trees
available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats

A couple, who had just done the Three Capes Walk https://www.threecapestrack.com.au/, purchased “Hair Acessories” and “The Bun”. They told me that on the first day of the walk they were greeted by a pair of Yellow-tailed black cockatoos. She said it was magical and they were able to watch them at a close range for a few minutes before they flew away.

Hair Accessories
The Bun

A couple from Sydney purchased a “Bunk Beds”, Hammock Life” and “Spiky Bunk Beds” prints. “Enchanted Forest I and II” are going to Brisbane to be framed and hung up in their 7-year-old daughter’s bedroom.

Enchanted Forest I prints available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/birds
Enchanted Forest II

A young lady bought A-5 sized prints of “Lazy Days” and “Weightless” to hang up in her bunk area to make it more cheerful she said. She lives on a sailboat.

Weightless

Two sisters, who saw my art at Peppercorn Gallery, Richmond, purchased a “Scarlet Robins” and “Lazy Days” tote bags, and “Spanish Eyes”, “Bunk Beds” and “Story time” prints.

Lazy Days tote bag

A lady bought a “Garden Roses” print for her Mum. I cut some these roses from my only rose bush in my garden, brought it inside and thought, hmm, I think I will try to paint these. I particularly liked the challenge and the light on the rose hips.

Garden Roses prints are available at: https://pjpaintings.com/collections/unfurling

A young teenager bought herself a small, framed “Southern Flow” print. Later in the afternoon, a lady returned to the stall to buy the same framed print and was met with disappointment as it wasn’t there anymore.

Southern Flow

Thank you for reading, following, and supporting my art journey throughout the months/years, and 2021. I hope that 2022 provides you with good health and treats you well.

from PJ Paintings

at site 30, Salamanca Market, Tasmania

Quality prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Enchanted Forest II

I painted an Australian forest scene that was purchased when I posted the painting on my Instagram account (https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/).

One of the birds featured in the painting is the Golden-shouldered parrot that I wrote about in an earlier blog post: https://wordpress.com/post/theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/6302

Another bird that is seriously struggling that is included in this painting is the Orange-bellied parrot, one of only a few migratory parrot species in the world and it is listed as critically endangered. The parrots breed in Melaleuca, on the west coast of Tasmania, feeding on button grass seeds and fly to the south east of mainland Australia in the winter. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/orange-bellied-parrot/ and https://birdlife.org.au/projects/orange-bellied-parrot-recovery

Another species facing an upward struggle, and also is listed as endangered, is the Tasmanian devil. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/tasmanian-devil/ and https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/tassie-devils. European settlers named them Tasmanian devils because of their skin-crawling, night-time howling. Tasmanian devils are smallish in size but look quite menacing when they open their large mouths and bare their teeth. Their strong jaws enable them to munch through bones with ease.

Enchanted Forest II

Birds from top left to right are a: Gouldian finch, Yellow-throated honeyeater, Boobook owl, Magpie, Wattle bird, Orange-bellied parrot, Sugar glider, Golden-shouldered parrot, New Holland honeyeater, Spotted-tail quoll and Tasmanian devil.

I hope that you are able to enjoy time in an enchanted forest near to wherever you are living and that efforts to save species are achieving successes.

Take care, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Salamanca Market Feb 1, 2020

On Friday, Hobart got to 40 degrees Celsius. It was hard work packing the car in that heat. The night was hot and uncomfortable, despite some rain falling during the night. Saturday morning, the gazebo was set up in muggy heat but thankfully as the day progressed, a breeze helped to cool things down.

A couple from Launceston, Tasmania, who had “Who, Who, Who are You? II” searched me out to buy more.

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Who, Who, Who are You? II

They arrived with their gorgeous 11 week old St Bernard puppy, named Lady Marmalade. They ended up buying five A-3 sized prints and an A-4 sized print of “Duck Crossing II”.

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eleven week old Lady Marmalade

An x-Tasmanian, now living in Queensland, bought “Hair Accessories” and “Hanging Out”. When she was in Tasmania she took care of Tasmanian Devils and Wombats. In Queensland she looks after Flying Foxes, Kangaroos and Wallabies.

A student, doing his final year of Occupational Therapy in Adelaide, bought a “Bunk Beds” print. A couple from Poland, who spoke very little English, purchased a “Hanging Out” print to take back to Europe with them.

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Bunk beds

A group from Amsterdam purchased “Family Outing” and two young women from France, both bought a “Richmond Bridge, Tasmania” print. A couple from Toronto, Canada purchased a “Salamanca Saturdays” print and a tote bag with the “Hanging Out” image printed on both sides.

A “Lazy Days” zipper pouch and a “Hanging Out” tote bag is travelling to Taiwan. A “Taking a Dip” print is going to be a 30th anniversary gift.

Taking a Dip
Taking a Dip

An Orange-bellied parrot and a Flame Robin original painting were purchased. One will be making its home in United States, the other in Hobart.

The most popular prints today were the wombat prints from the Sleepy Head series.

A thought to ponder: “An artist is not paid for his labour but for his vision”. James Whistler.

Wishing you a creatively happy upcoming week,

from Pj Paintings, site #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

P.S. Tote bags, pouches & prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

https://www.facebook.com/pjpaintings/

https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/

 

Lyndhurst Avenue

Yesterday, we had a great turnout, and hence, an invigorating urban sketching session, reinforcing the saying “the more, the merrier” as was such the case. We dispersed, picked our building to tackle and went to work.

I tried this duplex on Elizabeth Street. I took the photo about an hour afterwards, so the shadows had changed somewhat. I still ran into some perspective difficulties, but such is the learning process.

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Duplex on Elizabeth Street directly across Lyndhurst Avenue

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I sat under the shade of a large fig tree to draw the duplex

Afterwards, we had a coffee and our throw-down at the State Cinema, a very cool, stylishly restored cinema that has been screening moving pictures since 1913. Most of the Hobart sketchers group took on the Lyndhurst ornate house (feature photo). We had two new participants and a sketcher return from “their best holiday ever”, visiting Iran. We took turns perusing her amazing travel sketchbook and photo book. Stunning.

Upon my return home, I found myself still in the painting mode. So, I painted an orange-bellied parrot (thanks to Stuart J. Smith for giving me permission to use his photograph). Orange-bellied parrots are critically endangered with less than fifty parrots thought to exist in the wild today. With all the horrible bush fires, I wonder if they’ve fallen victim to the ferocious flames and if that number is even lower now?

They are not endemic to Tasmania but it is one of only three species of parrot to migrate. The orange-bellied parrot breeds in Tasmania and it winters in South Australia and Victoria.

orangbelliedparrotsml

Last year, at Salamanca Market, I met a retired university professor from the US and he is an avid birdwatcher. He has come to Tasmania every year for two or three decades. He bought virtually all the original paintings of endemic birds I painted. He’s back in Tasmania and sought me out at the market on the weekend. He said that all my paintings are framed and hanging at his residence. He’s 83 years old. He told me that they won’t let him rent a car/drive but some Tasmanian University contacts are taking him birdwatching and he’ll be doing some work there. Anyways, he was disappointed I didn’t have any original bird paintings and asked me to paint “lots” during the week. The Orange-bellied parrot is the first. It’s a start…

wishing everybody a safe week

 

Salamanca Market Oct 19, 2019

It showered off and on throughout the day and it was on the chilly side! Brrrr.

The first visitor to the PJ Paintings stall was a gentleman from China. He left with “The Three Amigos” and “Double Date IV” prints and some greeting cards.

Two young ladies from Denmark, who visited the stall before my visit to Canada, returned and purchased “Hanging Out” and “Bunk beds”.

The wombat prints stopped a group of young ladies, from Sydney, in their tracks. One said, “look what you’ve done, you’ve made her cry!” She was moved to tears by “Afternoon Siesta”. She purchased it along with “Spiky bunk beds”.

Grandparents bought a “Duck Crossing” print and tote bag for a grandchild. A mother bought “The Three Amigos” print for her daughter currently living in Dubai. Her strategy is to keep reminding her of Australia so that she gets homesick and returns.

Duck Crossing totebagB
Duck Crossing tote bag for granddaughter

A couple, originally from Kansas, USA, now living in Singapore, left with “Family Outing” and “Under My Red Umbrella” prints.

Every time I think of discontinuing the tote bags and/or the pouches, there’s a real flurry with them. I counted approximately thirteen tote bags and pouches and 40 greeting cards that went. “What the Devil!?” was particularly popular with the bags and pouches today.

Four of my Inktober original paintings sold today: “The Happy Wanderers”, “Swing”, “Big Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Kangaroo” and “Treading through the Tulips” (not tip-toeing through the tulips!)

Also, my small original painting of the extremely endangered Orange-bellied Parrot sold.

orangebelliedparrot
Orange-bellied Parrot

The most popular prints today were the wombats and whales.

My prints and greeting cards are available at Artefacts Gallery in the Salamanca Arts Centre. In the meantime, I’m trying to keep up with the demands of the Inktober2019 Challenge and I’m posting my drawings at www.theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com and www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade

A thought to ponder: “I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells,” Dr. Seuss (Love it!)

Take care and keep the creative juices flowing,
from the Pjpaintings stall #30 at Salamanca Market.
P.S. Prints, tote bags & pouches are available at www.pjpaintings.com

PjPaintings at Salamanca Market June 8, 2019

It was another mild winter’s day at Salamanca Market. It was busier than last weekend with things ramping up for Dark Mofo and other activities taking place this weekend, for example, the Australia School’s Sailing Competition. The manager and organiser, from Adelaide, was very excited to lay her eyes on “Family Outing”. She bought it to give to her friend for her birthday.  She said that the only one in her group of friends at university that had a car, was her girlfriend, who had a red mini.  They used to all pile into her car to go to parties. This friend is turning 60 this year and has ordered a red mini (a real one) as a birthday present for herself and is having a big number “60” painted on it.

Family Outing VIsml

A return visitor, who bought a “Richmond Bridge” and “Suspended” print a few years ago, (she gave Suspended to her grandson, who loved it she told me), purchased more prints. This time, she bought: “Bunk beds”, “Surfing Clifton Beach, Tasmania” and “Hayride”.

A couple, celebrating their 22nd anniversary, visiting from Adelaide, purchased a “Salamanca Saturdays” tote bag and small pouch. They moved to Adelaide four years ago from California, USA.  Their daughter married an Australia so they followed her to Australia.

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A Salamanca Market Tote bag, made in Australia, 100% polyester and washable

 

A young lady, here from Perth, doing some work with Dark Mofo, bought “Bunk beds”.  She said that she’s going to hang it where her stairs are so it makes her smile each day when she goes down the stairs in the morning.

Taking a Dip
Taking a Dip

A lovely lady from Sydney, going to Melbourne via a stop-over in Tasmania, visited the stall twice.  She wished that her sister, who also lives in Sydney, had joined her for a sisterly holiday. She’s taking back with her “Bunk beds”, for her sister, “Taking a Dip” for herself, “Duck Crossing”, “Beachside Chatter”, “Who, Who, Who are You II” and “Hanging Out”.

Another conservationist working on the Orange-bellied parrot breeding program at the captive breeding facility at Five Mile Beach, Hobart, stopped by and chatted.  She’d like me to paint the Wedge-tailed eagle, Frogmouth and the Orange-bellied parrot. They are on my bucket list… J

Today’s most popular prints were the wombats: “Afternoon Siesta” and “Bunk beds”.

A thought to ponder from the artist, Bob Ross: “We don’t make mistakes, just happy little accidents.”

Wishing you a week full of emu antics and joy,

from the Pjpaintings stall #30 at Salamanca Market.

P.S. Prints and tote bags are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

A first for the first

A couple months ago, I met a young lady at Salamanca Market that had just moved to Tasmania having secured a dream job, employed to work on the Orange-bellied Parrot Tasmanian Breeding Program. The Orange-bellied Parrot has been ranked as one of the world’s rarest and most endangered species and is on the brink of extinction.

I had often thought of painting this brightly coloured little parrot and meeting her gave me that extra bit of needed motivation.  I drew several sketches and then got distracted with wombats and square dancing emus.  She returned to the stall this week and told me that she had been here for two months already! Meeting her the second time, really spurred me on to apply paint to one of my sketches.

Here’s my first painting of 2019 and the first time I’ve ever painted a Orange-bellied Parrot. (I also finished off the kangaroo and joey today, photo posted above, but it wasn’t the first time I’ve painted kangaroos).

orangebelliedparrot
Orange-bellied Parrot water colour painting, painted on paper made 100% from recycled cotton rags

The Orange-bellied Parrot is a migratory bird, which breeds only in coastal south-west Tasmania and spends the winter in coastal Victoria and South Australia. In Tasmania, it occurs in buttongrass moorland interspersed with patches of forest or tea tree scrub.

I wonder how many more “firsts” will occur in 2019??? Did you have any stand-out ‘firsts’ in 2018 or have any planned for 2019?

Happy New Year to all!  Wishing that 2019 is kind to all of you, filled with happiness, smiles, good health and many good ‘first’ experiences are had.

Cheers, Patricia (Pj) Hopwood-Wade