House Sketch

There’s a house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania that I am drawn to (and therefore draw) lol. It’s a house that says draw-me, draw-me, so I did, again.

My latest drawing of the house:

A house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania

I decided that I really wanted the umbrella to stand out this time.

Here’s a drawing of the house I did earlier in the year.

minimalist painting (sold)

Photo of the house from where it was drawn.

The house that says “draw-me”

Is there a house or building that says “draw-me” when you see it?

Take care and wishing you happy drawing times.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

Constructing a Nest

I am fascinated by birds’ nests and their construction with only a beak-tool. In my opinion, they are the ultimate functional art piece. I have several abandoned nests as decorations and as painting resources at my house.

I also love birds. The bird that has particularly caught my attention recently, is the Forty-Spotted Pardalote. They are rare and listed as endangered. There are some Forty-Spotted Pardalotes trying to survive on Bruny Island, an island off the island of Tasmania. https://www.bien.org.au/projects/40-spotted-pardalote/ Efforts are being made to try to help the species survive. A major strategy is building nest boxes for them. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-07-21/endangered-bird-faces-new-threat/6735504?nw=0&r=HtmlFragment

Collecting data from a Forty-spotted Pardalote’s nesting box on Bruny Island

I am in the process of constructing a 2-D nest, which I think I’ll be spending more time on than a Forty-spotted Pardalote does to build a 3-D nest!

A Forty-spotted Pardalote waiting for the construction worker to finish building its nest

I hope that you spot plenty of birds today. They always deliver a joyous moment.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

http://www.pjpaintings.com

My Favourite Painting

I did an indoor-urban sketch of a corner of my lounge room. In this corner, some of my favourite things are displayed but they are difficult to see.  So, I would like to introduce them to you and tell their stories, starting with the painting sitting on the coffee table.

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Painting sitting on my coffee table

I bought this painting when I was visiting my son when he worked for three years in Ethiopia. I asked his driver if he could take me to to an art supply store.  He told me there wasn’t any in Addis Ababa and he took me to what may have been the only art gallery in the capital city. In the entrance, photos of past American presidents visiting the gallery greet you, giving the immediate impression that the gallery is highly esteemed and has a good reputation.

This painting moved me and I immediately connected with it. I think the composition is brave. I’m not sure what it is, on the side background but I think that is a courageous way to deal with that space. The lady’s face looks so strong and confident, yet there is a tear balancing on a lower eyelid. Her face holds my attention and I find it difficult to take my eyes away from hers. I like the colour scheme of black, blue and red too.

I decided I had to buy it otherwise it will be a lifelong regret. When I was paying for it, I asked if I could have some information about the artist. She replied that she didn’t know who the artist was. She was the lady in the photos standing beside US President Clinton and Obama, so I was rather surprised that she didn’t know who the artist of a painting she was selling was. I asked if she could find out and email me because I’d really like to know. I never did find out. I also, asked if they had bubble wrap because it was going back to Australia and to my horror it came back wrapped in newspaper. There are some marks on the painting from the newspaper but I don’t mind because it just adds to the authenticity of the African experience and I love it.

I loved my time in Ethiopia and i love my souvenir painting.

Thank you for letting me share it with you.

Very Succulent

For my lock-down Coronavirus Pandemic urban sketch this week, I drew my succulent garden. It is my favourite part of my yard. I had to remove two layers of weed mats and a massive amount of white ornamental rocks from this triangular area to create it. The big rock was there so I placed a few more balancing rocks on it.

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I’ve managed to capture the angle of the path true to life, which is a pain to walk on, but I took some liberties with the succulents  🙂

Experts are warning that rock stacking in nature is endangering Australian animals, causing erosion, disturbing wildlife habitats and damaging ecosystems, and can result in being issued a fine. I’m assuming that in a garden bed it is okay.

Here’s one of my favourite succulents. I love the uniquely shaped leaves. They look like they have mouths.

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Here’s some of my other favourite succulents.

Here’s my journal page of this week’s sketch.

Thanks for visiting. Take care and be careful!

I Spy……. a Bear!

… and a mouse, elephant and moose!

A mass teddy bear hunt is under way around the world to help distract the millions of children locked down because of the coronavirus pandemic. Stuffed toys are being placed in windows to give children a fun and safe activity while walking around neighbourhoods with their parents/carers.

Here’s my contribution to the movement…

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My bear, elephant, mouse and moose collection

The grey, green and cream teddy bears are ones that I made before I knew I liked to paint. The three other bears are from Canada. The mouse I fell in love with in my travels on the mainland of Australia. The moose is from Sweden. My son worked three years in Ethiopia and gave me the handmade knitted elephant from Ethiopia. I also added a painting I did of my handmade Christmas teddy bear.

Another act prompted by the Coronavirus Pandemic is that for the month of April, I’ve removed all shipping costs for website orders made in Australia. I have different sized quality prints, some original paintings, tote bags, zipper pouches and greeting cards available at http://www.pjpaintings.com.

I hope my paintings and the window scene brings a smile to many faces.

Take care and thanks for the visit.

18 York Street

I’m trying to stick to my goal of drawing Bellerive houses. I postponed venturing out onto the footpath (sidewalk) until later in the evening on the 24th of December to avoid all the foot traffic from the Hurricanes Big Bash game against the Melbourne Renegades at the Blundstone Oval, which by the way, the Tasmania Hurricanes were the winners. 🙂 Often, I’m at the oval watching the game but not this time because my cricket-bud is overseas visiting England.

Anyways, I settled myself on my stool, and no sooner than after drawing my first couple lines, a car, towing a boat, pulled up just behind me, which entailed a lot of unpacking, unloading a dog and consequently dog-barking activity. Eventually, the dog was brought inside because it was not happy with me sitting in front of its house and wasn’t about to stop trying to communicate this to me.

After all the Lamy pen bleeding debacle with my last drawing,

this time I tried a different approach and drew some initial lines with a water colour pencil and then inked it with an Artline pen. Using an Artline pen is nowhere near the pleasure of using an ink nibbed pen. I might give myself a belated Christmas present and order a Fude pen (a Liz Steel, Australian urban sketcher guru, recommendation).  I’m not very happy with this drawing (got the side perspective wrong again) but it is part of my skill-development journey, whether I like it or not. Also, Liz Steel says that one of the most common mistakes people make is draw too much roof. I concur.

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an imperfect drawing of 18 York Street, Bellerive, Tasmania

I hope you’ve had a pleasant day digesting and working off Christmas lunches or dinners, or both.

York Street, I’ll be back!

Swinging

I’m getting into the swing of this Inktober challenging daily drawing challenge! (lol) Today’s prompt word is “swing”.

 

I’m giving myself an extra pat on the back because I’m visiting my family in Canada while doing this. (I live in Tasmania, Australia). Doing Inktober while abroad has added an extra layer of challenge.  Thankfully the prompt list was released a month or so early, so I was able to get a lot of ideas worked out and a few rough sketches done before the challenge started.

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“Swing” (21 x 21 cm painted on paper made 100% from recycled cotton rags)

Hoping your week is going swimmingly, wherever on the globe you are, from PJ Paintings

This original is for sale and can be purchased at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Italian Poppies

The urban sketching workshop I attended (May 2019), taught by Liz Steel and organised by Mike Botton, took place in the Umbria area of Italy.  This region is green, hilly and dotted with green’s complementary colour of red.  It was so beautiful seeing wild  poppies.

We settled in the quaint, small town of Montone, where at every corner, and everywhere in between, there was a scene I yearned to paint. We visited a few towns in the region and passed poppies growing in cracks in the pavement, at the base of street signs, along the gravel sides of roads, fences, gates and in the fields. This is the view from the hotel room’s bathroom at the Hotel Fortebraccio. Do you see the fields of red poppies in this photo and in the photo above?

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view from the bathroom at the Hotel Fortebraccio

We visited the town of Assisi that is grandly presented on a green platter sprinkled with red garnish.

I painted this scene for the end-of-the-course postcard exchange.

 

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Basilica di San Francesco

I used to paint poppy fields quite often.

It was good re-visiting a topic that I haven’t painted for several years and playing with the punch-factor that complementary colours can deliver. What topic/theme is capturing your interest? I’d love to hear about it.

Thanks for visiting.

 

 

Red, Yellow and Blue

In Sintra, not far from Lisbon, there is a magical, fairy tale-like palace, the Pena Palace.  They must have had so much fun building this outlandish, fantastical and ornate palace.  It is a must see but I strongly, strongly, strongly advise that you get there as soon as it opens.  Our tour group arrived at 9 am and we were basically able to walk straight in but on our way out, we were aghast to see the queue and there were hundreds more joining the queue for the two hour wait, in addition to another queue lower down, to buy a ticket to enter the grounds to join the two-hour queue to get into the palace.

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Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal

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Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal

After visiting the Pena Palace, we stopped at Cascais before heading to Europe’s westernmost point, Cabo da Roca. At Cascais, I drew this bright red building. I had to get back on the bus before I could paint it, so it was painted at the hotel.

Cascais building
The Loja Das Meias

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Photo taken from where I was standing to draw the Loja Das Meias

While waiting at the Santa Apolonia Station in Lisbon, to catch a train to Coimbra, Portugal, this bright blue building caught my eye.  So I drew it and was able to partly paint the picture before I had to board the train (I can’t understand why the train didn’t want to wait for me to finish my painting??! :-/ ).

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I like the yellow colour next to the bright blue.  I’ve painted a red, yellow and blue building in Portugal.  I wonder which colour is next?!

Thanks for visiting and take care.

Having a go in Lisbon

Lisbon is a gorgeous city and an urban sketchers dream, or nightmare, depending on how challenged you like to be.  It has thousands of ornate and exquisite buildings. I got up early and drew this building located in the suburb of Alfama in Lisbon.

Lisbon building

Then I returned back to my B&B and set off to have a renowned custard tart (a Pasteis De Nata).  Most businesses don’t open before 10 am, so while waiting for the Patisserie to open, I started to sketch this building.  The Patisserie opened before I could finish the drawing. It has hand painted tiles for fire protection covering the  front of the building.

Then, as recommended by the tourist guide books, I experienced a ride on the Elevador Da Gloria.  It is an well-admired feat of engineering.  The tram system was built in 1885, originally powered by water displacement, then this system was superseded by steam and then eventually powered by electricity. While waiting for the tram, I did this quick and tiny sketch.

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The Elevador Da Gloria

At the top, this house caught my eye and I sketched part of it.

Then I returned to my initial morning’s sketching spot and applied paint to the drawing.  This time there were people constantly streaming by and the consistent theme being discussed was directions and trying to determine which direction to go.  Where I was drawing from was a five way street corner.

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I tried to have a go at drawing as opportunities arose as I explored this awesome city of Lisbon.

Thanks for stopping by. Cheers.