An Encounter with Police

During the Australia Day long weekend, I visited Stanley and Corinna, small towns on the northwest coast of Tasmania. We saw amazing things on our road trip, but all the sights seen were in the realm of what you would expect to see: animals, birds, spectacular scenery and the like.

one of the many cute cottages in Corinna, Tasmania

But things got a little different on the leg from Stanley to Corinna.

To get to Corinna from the Smithton direction, you drive on a 70 km stretch of unsealed road, full of potholes. The road is quite narrow and when a white ute was approaching, we pulled off to the side and stopped to let it pass. We were somewhat affronted that the driver didn’t make a thank you hand gesture and quickly made the judgment that they must not be local as this is Tasmanian behaviour and considered good manners. Sure enough, it was confirmed when we saw that the ute had a Queensland number plate.

We continued our slow drive, manoeuvring around potholes, avoiding one other car that passed us. About 10 km later, a dark ute passed us, flashed its lights and reversed. A policeman jumped out of his ute with his mobile phone showing us a photo and asking if we had seen this white ute with Queensland number plates? The officer asked us about three times if we were definitely certain we had seen the ute and we recounted him our encounter with this ill-mannered Queenslander. (It turned out he wasn’t from Queensland). Then the policeman started asking us tricky questions about where on the road this encounter took place and so on, but we told him we were too unfamiliar with the road to give him that kind of information. He took my name, address, registration and so on and then we parted ways.

We eventually arrived in beautiful Corinna, which has no internet, wifi, TV and so on. On my previous visit to Corinna, I did quite a bit of urban sketching, which you can see my drawings by clicking on this link https://wordpress.com/post/theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/5532 This time, I spent more time enjoying the natural surroundings of the Pieman River and went kayaking for the first time in my life.

The beautiful Pieman River, Corinna

Upon returning to civilization, we learned that the white ute with Queensland number plate, was actually a kidnapper! Apparently, he attempted to kidnap two children, but one escaped. It was reported that he had the kidnapped girl in the ute. Thankfully, the police did successfully capture him. Here are links to the incident. https://www.tasmaniatalks.com.au/newsroom/tasmanian-news/54934-attempted-child-abduction-sparks-hunt

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-01-25/tasmania-police-arrest-man-after-alleged-attempted-abduction/13088706

We couldn’t believe it that we saw, and drove by, a kidnapper!

Safe driving everybody and beware of ill-mannered drivers with foreign number plates.

Lover’s Falls, Corinna

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Penguin

On the coastal road between Ulverstone and Wynyard, on the north west coast of Tasmania, lies a small town named Penguin. It was first settled in 1861 as a timber town. It is named after the smallest species of penguins, the fairy penguins, that come ashore all the way along Tasmania’s north-west coast, but especially at a little beach bluff between Ulverstone and Burnie known as Penguin Point.

Penguin beach and in the far background, a retaining wall being installed to save further beach erosion from severe weather events.

As the name suggests, penguins are a frequent theme in this town. It’s nestled along the Bass Strait and has pretty beach views, walkways, beach decorations and a cemetery.

5 meter tall penguin
More penguin humour
Beach Art
beach themed decoration, a patchwork quilted bikini top
one of the many penguin themed rubbish bins on the main street

Penguin was featured on ABC’s Back Roads show. The cemetery was allotted significant focus and time on the show. It is where apparently many community social activities take place and the best view of Penguin is espoused to be from there. Therefore, I made a special effort to find it and see the view from the cemetery myself. It is spectacular, but I didn’t stay too long because I found it sad. You can’t help but read some of the tombstones that are close to the top circular driveway (the entrance & exit) that are of children who have been lost.

One of the views from the cemetery

I left the cemetery and continued with the next leg of my road trip. Penguin is a quaint and lovely place to stop, relax and enjoy. https://www.aussietowns.com.au/town/penguin-tas

My latest work in progress, titled “Goldilocks and the 20 penguins” featuring the endearing fairy penguins. Just imagine the surprise that these penguins have experienced after their evening fishing session, to come home to find a sleepy wombat in one of their nests!!

Goldilocks and the 20 penguins

I hope your upcoming week isn’t too hectic and that you are able to take the time to relax.

The Edge of the World

After staying overnight at Arthur’s River, on Tasmania’s northwest coast, and before making my way to Corinna, I was almost blown off the “Edge of the World”!!

beaches littered with logs at The Edge of the World, Tasmania

The Edge of the World is a wild and bleak place with relentless, grey-blue, angry waves, as evidenced by large amounts, and large-in-size, debris littering the beaches. It is beautiful to stand, feel and see the power and ruggedness of the ocean and its shores absorbing the constant mercilessness of it.

The view at The Edge of the Word, Gardiner Point, Tasmania

The ocean from this point to Argentina is the longest uninterrupted stretch of ocean on Earth. Inscribed on a stone plinth at the Edge is a poem written by tourism pioneer Brian Inder (Dec 1930- Aug 2019) describing the feeling of standing at this spot, being in awe of the surroundings, and reflecting that we are all little more than a speck in the spectrum of time.

Brian Inder is a well-admired in the Tasmanian northwest tourism industry, best known for founding Tasmazia & the Village of Lower Crackpot. https://www.tasmazia.com.au/ He was also pivotal in establishing Mural Fest, The Edge of the World and Mount Roland cableway.

The calmer side of the beach

This region is known as the Arthur-Pieman Conservation area. It was home to four Aboriginal clans: Peerapper, Monegin, Taskinener and Peternidic. We do not know how many people lived here before Europeans arrived. Within just 40 years, most tribal Aborigines died of European diseases while others were killed or exiled to Flinders Island.

The largest middens are in the northwest of Tasmania. Aboriginal shell middens are distinctive mounds that contain a rich history of past Aboriginal hunting, gathering and food processing activities. Discarded shells and bone, botanical remains, ash and charcoal tell the story that the Aboriginal feasted on different type of shellfish and seabirds. The women gathered shellfish and food plants, dived for abalone, lobster and were experts at hunting seals. They dug themselves hiding spots in the cobble beaches, where they hid and waited until they saw the opportunity to pounce on an unsuspecting seal and clubbed it to death. In the early 1800s, some European sealers and whalers took Aboriginal women to help them catch seals. Some of today’s Tasmanian Aborigines have descended from these women’s relations with the sealers and whalers.

At the viewing platform there are informative information plaques

There were many little birds darting around in the bushes along the path back to the car park.

A male Superb fairy-wren
Resting place for displaced logs at the Edge of the World, Tasmania

Thank you for visiting.

The Famous Wineglass Bay

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania, rates highly as one of the top beaches in the world. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/wineglass-bay

My girlfriend, who is soon moving to New Zealand, and I are doing a road trip in Tasmania, one last look for her before she leaves. Wineglass Bay was our first stop. On the way, we saw a sweet little echidna on the side of the road. They are quite common in Tasmania, but I certainly don’t see them very often. https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/echidna

It’s quite a steep trek to the Wineglass viewing platform. I love the boulders, their shape, strength and colour.

passing by boulders on way to the viewing platform
A quick sketch of the boulders

Scenes from the viewing platform.

Wineglass Bay with Hazards Beach on the other side
My quick sketch of the view

On our walk back to the car park, going the Hazards Beach way, my friend suddenly stopped and screamed. It’s strange how childhood experiences embed in brains so deeply. I immediately thought there must be a bear ahead on the track, but at the same time my brain told me that there are no bears in Australia (I have encountered bears several times in Canada while bush walking) and then I saw a snake slither into the bush. I had to push my friend past as she is petrified of snakes.

We saw many fairy wrens in the bush, which inspired this inktober drawing (it’ll look nicer when I add paint :-). What does Wineglass Bay and Superb fairy-wrens have in common….?

a fairy wren being a good dad

…… they have both been voted #1 and they are both a brilliant turquoise. https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/08/six-things-you-didnt-know-about-superb-fairy-wrens/

After walking for four hours, we were grateful to be sitting down! We had a counter meal in Coles Bay where I met a fellow Belgian, Annabelle.

Two Belgians in Coles Bay, Tasmania

Thanks for visiting.

Cheers from PJ Paintings

PjPaintings at Salamanca Market January 19, 2019

Over the years, I have submitted applications to several art co-op galleries but having a day job has been a barrier to being accepted because it limits the days you can do gallery duty and your flexibility to pick up days when a member is sick or on holidays. Nevertheless, after my fourth time applying to Artefacts Inc Gallery, in the Salamanca Arts Centre, I am very excited that I have been accepted!! I now have the opportunity to display and sell some of my prints, original paintings, pouches and tote bags and do gallery duty. I’ll mainly be doing gallery duty on Mondays. It would be lovely if you could call in and have a chat. It hosts the stunning work of a Tasmanian wood turner, glass maker, jewellery maker, ceramics, leatherwork and watercolour & acrylic painter.
 
When I went by the gallery this morning, I noticed that it wasn’t open. I unexpectedly opened and minded the gallery for an hour or so until the member on duty arrived.
 
Back at the Pj Paintings stall, two girlfriends, one from London, UK, and the other from Sydney, NSW, holidaying together in Tasmania and then driving the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, bought a ‘Mercedes Time’ print for a souvenir of their driving holiday.

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Mercedes Time!

 
A couple from Washington, DC, USA, bought ‘Yellow Poppy Fields’ and ‘Do-Si-Do’. They have a relative that square dances. A perfect gift for a square dancer!

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Do-si-do

 
A group of four, from Emu Plains, NSW, purchased an original painting of a wombat, a ‘Family Outing’ print and an ‘Under My Red Umbrella’ tote bag.

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Original painting of a wombat just hanging out among the gum leaves

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A lady, who is what is often referred to as “snowbirds” on the North American continent, lives half a year in Spain and the other half of the year in Florida, USA, purchased an ‘Outback Glamping’ print as she had visited Uluru. Her son lives in Alice Spring.
A mother and young daughter, starting grade three in a few weeks, purchased four A-5 sized prints of Tasmanian scenes that I’ve painted. The girl reminded her mother several times that she had to get back to keep working. I asked her what she was working on and she said that she was making a stadium for her 11 year old brother’s birthday. I queried how she was constructing this elaborate-sounding birthday present. It is being built inside a cardboard box with more cardboard, paper, glue, crayons and paints. What an admirable project and unique birthday present. I hope her brother appreciates the effort and remembers that ‘it is the thought that counts’.
 
A young boy and his mother visited the stall. The boy told me that he loves owls. He had to spend his own money to buy an owl print. That’s a huge sacrifice and I feel doubly honoured when a child uses their own money to buy my art. His mother bought a ‘Sleepyhead’ print for herself.

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Sleepyhead

 
Another child, a little older than the boy who had just bought an owl print, this one seemed close to the 12 year old range, bought a ‘Thunder’ print. She loves elephants.

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Thunder!

 
The day ended with two young ladies arriving at the market, and my stall, after 3 pm, when many have already completely packed up or are well into the packing-up process. They bought a ‘Suspended’ print. They were planning to see the rest of the market. I recommended that they walk really, really quickly, as the market has 353 stalls.

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Suspended

 
After packing up, I drove the long way home, as the most direct route to the Tasman Bridge was closed due to the installation of the Remembrance Bridge. It was bumper-to-bumper and a slow ride home.
 
The most popular print this weekend was: Salamanca Saturdays
A thought to ponder: “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Albert Einstein
 
Thanks for stopping by,
from the Pjpaintings stall #30 at Salamanca Market.
Pj Paintings’ prints, tote bags and pouches are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com