Melbourne Visit

We’re off to Melbourne.

Drawn from the Hobart, Tasmania terminal, while waiting for our plane.

After arriving on Friday, we wandered around and settled for a bite to eat in one of the laneways in the city. This was our view from our eating spot.

View from our eating spot in Meyers Lane, Melbourne
initial drawing, Meyers Lane
Meyers Lane’s view

The next day started by a visit to the South Melbourne Market and then exploring St Kilda, including this cool community garden.

cool sculptures in various gardeners’ patches
I love worms too 🙂
I love buttons for art and decorating. 🙂

The visit to St. Kilda ended with sketching a duplex that caught my eye on Park Street. I love the roofline decorative tiles so many of the older houses have in this area. On Park Street itself, there were quite a few raised garden beds in front of houses.

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sketch with paint, Park Street, St. Kilda

Sunday morning, we viewed the amazing Picasso exhibition https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/the-picasso-century/

One of the first exhibition picture on display is Picasso’s second-ever etching titled “Le Repas Frugal”, 1904.

Two of Picasso’s paintings of his first wife, Olga Khokhlova. Despite the Spanish flavour of the 1917 painting, Olga is from Russia, a ballet dancer, with Ukrainian origins. I find it interesting that she is depicted with quite big hands and feet in the first painting. From 1919 to 1929, Olga received over 500 letters from her mother and sister, whom she didn’t see.

“The Reader” 1920 oil on canvas
Olga in Armchair by Pablo Picasso, 1917
“Portrait of a woman” by Pablo Picasso, 1938, oil on canvas Maar and Picasso became lovers and intellectual confidants. Maar was the inspiration for many portraits, including this 1938 canvas
Picasso’s “The Kiss”
1921 oil on canvas
“Weeping woman” oil on canvas by Pablo Picasso, 1937
Pablo Picasso 1881-1973
“Massacre in Korea”
1951 oil on plywood
Picasso painted this work in reaction to the Korean War. Nothing in this painting specifically ties to Korea, not the landscape or people. Picasso said that when he thinks of war he does not think of a particular trait, only that of monstrosity. I agree and think this should be applied to all wars, including the current war being waged on Ukraine.
“The Bay of Cannes” 1958 oil on canvas

These are only a fraction of the paintings on display. After the exhibition, we found a spot to sketch the renowned Flinders Station. I was settling nicely into the zone, then the rain disturbed my happy space.

My weekend in Melbourne finished with the fairy tale magic of Cinderella.

Trust that your week is is travelling along magically.

cheers, Patricia

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Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

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I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.

A Fish Tree?!

Each year, Art Farm Birchs Bay (AFBB) hosts the renowned Sculpture Trail, featuring Tasmanian and interstate artists. The farm is approximately 35 minutes south of Hobart, Tasmania. It is an innovative working farm in the south D’Entrecasteaux Channel region and home to Diemen Pepper http://www.diemenpepper.com/. Many Tasmanian restaurants source their native pepper from AFBB. Not only are you free to wander leisurely to view the sculptures, you can meander through fields, orchards and an extensive kitchen garden.

Let’s begin our tour and see some of 2020’s sculptures on display:

This is the very first sculpture on the trail
I really enjoyed this sculpture. The birds are so cute!
a close up of two of the birds
an eagle
mobile phone danger
life changes
mushroom types
A cute galah
Another galah
a close up of the galah’s feathers

This is my art work featuring a galah, a watercolour painting titled “Iconic Aussies”. It was tricky incorporating it into this painting because of its bright pink colour. It ran the risk of dominating the painting too much. To help the eye travelling across the painting, I painted pink into the trunk of the tree below the yellow-sulphur crested cockatoo and some pink onto its feathers too.

Similar to this tree spotted on the sculpture trail.

the colourful trunk of a eucalyptus trunk

I hope that wherever you are, that you are safe and in good health. Thank you for visiting.

Adorable Emus!

Look at what my friend, Sarah, found on the main street of Hamilton, Tasmania, Australia! Aren’t they just gorgeous!

A very gorgeous couple. Photo taken by Sarah Howe

Hamilton is a small Georgian and early Victorian town in the Derwent Valley, approximately 70 km northwest of Hobart. https://www.aussietowns.com.au/town/hamilton-tas It hasn’t been overly-commercialised and therefore provides the opportunity to get a better feel for what village life was like in the 1830s and 1840s with many well-preserved historic buildings.

It has a population of 300, is of historical significance, has an awesome bakery and now two gorgeous emu residents, which I can’t wait to visit and share a cup of tea with them!

Thank you for stopping by.

Footsteps towards Freedom

I visited the newest sculpture installation at MACq 01 in Hobart just after it stopped raining which made it even a more powerful, emotive and moving experience.  I’ve never been so moved by a sculpture before.  I’m sure that the sculpture being women and children contributed to it being so moving for me, and why I connected with it so much, empathizing with, and for, my gender, and the horrors these women and children endured.

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Sculptures in front of the Macq01, Hunter Street, Hobart

The bronze sculptures bring to the forefront the untold stories of impoverished women and children convicts, many from Ireland, who arrived in Hobart Town more than 150 years ago. The sculptures are the work of internationally celebrated Irish artist, Rowan Gillespie. The sculptures took two years to complete and are modelled on descendants of Tasmania’s convicts.

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The body language captured in the young boy sculpture is so emotive.

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The raindrops running down the boy’s face breaks your heart

The women were marched off to the Female Factory for some form of assignment, and the children were considered orphans, removed from their mothers and placed in orphanages.  The suffering, both physical and emotional, endured by the women and children was enormous and these bronze sculptures commemorates the experiences of these often-forgotten people.

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Females’ and children’s sufferings and contributions are so often under-represented and commemorated in public art.  I’m so pleased and proud that these beautiful sculptures have been added to our city.

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Maq01 Hobart, Tasmania

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If you visit Hobart, Tasmania, it’s well worth seeing these outdoor works of art.

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my drawing of the Hunter Street and Maq01 view

Take care and thanks for visiting.

 

Villa Cornaro Palladiana, Vicenza, Italy

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The front entrance of Villa Cornaro

Our urban sketching group visited Villa Cornaro Palladiana, owned by Carl and Sally Gable, who bought this summer “house” approximately 30 years ago. Carl graciously gave us a guided tour of his home.  Here’s a quick attempt at sketching our guide.

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When Carl and Sally purchased the property, Carl said that they hadn’t even heard of the architect, Andrea Palladio, 1508-1580.  They have done a lot of research since and Carl delivered a captivating and informative tour.  Usually Palladio designed long and one level structures but because the owners that employed Palladio purchased a square shaped block of land, Palladio had to adapt his design to fit onto the piece of land.  To compromise on symmetry was absolutely non-negotiable for Palladio, so he designed his first ever two story building – the Villa Cornaro Palladiana.

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The dramatic two storey designed villa – a first for Andrea Palladio.

Inside, there are grand frescoes and sculptures adorning walls.

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Sculpted oval frames adorned with cherubs surround sculptures on each wall.

The Villa Cornaro remained in the Cornaro family for 253 years, and then three different families took ownership of it until 1951.  It was then vacant for approximately a decade until a church purchased it and ran a kindergarten in the building.  The church thought that the cherubs’ lack of modesty was inappropriate for the four to five year old kindergarten students, so they had all cherubs’ penises removed!

All the villas we had visited so far, had painted pillars in the frescoes, which gave the impression that the room was bigger than it actually was. In the Villa Cornaro they had large sculptures of family members facing real, majestic pillars in the grand main room.

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Cornaro statues

In 1969, the Villa Cornaro was once again privately owned and restored over a period of 20 years and then in 1989, Carl and Sally Gable purchased the property.  They are the sixth family to occupy the villa in its 450 year history.  The Gables have published a book about their relationship with this majestic building.  The book is titled, Palladian Days: Finding a New Life in a Venetian Country House.

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The front of the Villa Cornaro Palladiana with some of the urban sketchers looking dwarfed by the impressive two storey entrance.

After the tour, we went out back and were given 15 minutes to sketch the house.  I was quite pleased that I was able to draw it up in 15 minutes, as speed drawing is not my forte.  I’m fairly new to urban sketching – about 9 months new, definitely wearing L Plates, so I was happy that I remembered the vertical vanishing point.  My brain seems to more easily remember and work out horizontal vanishing points and completely forget about the vertical ones or allows the brain to override the eye, and win that battle and the brain ends up being incorrect! Lesson to self: trust the eye rather than the logic the brain uses to try to manipulate you to believing it (walls and sides of houses are straight says the brain). Has anyone else encountered this battle?  What is your strategy to avoid the trap of allowing the brain to win against your better judgment (eye)?

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The back of the Cornaro  and my drawing of part of the back view of the villa. I applied water colour to the drawing when we returned to our hotel.

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A statue at the front of Cornaro

Loving Italy, loving Vicenza! Thanks for visiting.