Enchanted Forest I

I painted another Australian forest scene. Birds from top left to right are a: Scarlet Robin, Silvereye, Galah, Kookaburra, Tawny frogmouth, Pink robin, Yellow-crested cockatoo, Yellow-tailed black cockatoo, koala, Beautiful firetail, and wombat.

Sadly the iconic koala, listed as vulnerable, could soon be upgraded to endangered. Fires, droughts, and lost of natural habitat and corridors are all contributing to its startling drop in numbers.

I hope you are able to enjoy a bit of the joy that nature has to offer, today.

Take care, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

http://www.pjpaintings.com

A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Enchanted Forest II

I painted an Australian forest scene that was purchased when I posted the painting on my Instagram account (https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/).

One of the birds featured in the painting is the Golden-shouldered parrot that I wrote about in an earlier blog post: https://wordpress.com/post/theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/6302

Another bird that is seriously struggling that is included in this painting is the Orange-bellied parrot, one of only a few migratory parrot species in the world and it is listed as critically endangered. The parrots breed in Melaleuca, on the west coast of Tasmania, feeding on button grass seeds and fly to the south east of mainland Australia in the winter. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/orange-bellied-parrot/ and https://birdlife.org.au/projects/orange-bellied-parrot-recovery

Another species facing an upward struggle, and also is listed as endangered, is the Tasmanian devil. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/tasmanian-devil/ and https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/tassie-devils. European settlers named them Tasmanian devils because of their skin-crawling, night-time howling. Tasmanian devils are smallish in size but look quite menacing when they open their large mouths and bare their teeth. Their strong jaws enable them to munch through bones with ease.

Enchanted Forest II

Birds from top left to right are a: Gouldian finch, Yellow-throated honeyeater, Boobook owl, Magpie, Wattle bird, Orange-bellied parrot, Sugar glider, Golden-shouldered parrot, New Holland honeyeater, Spotted-tail quoll and Tasmanian devil.

I hope that you are able to enjoy time in an enchanted forest near to wherever you are living and that efforts to save species are achieving successes.

Take care, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Salamanca Market September 11, 2021

The morning started with beautiful blue skies but because rain was forecasted, I put the gazebo’s three walls up and awning. It’s surprising how much time this takes. I suppose because I need a stool to reach, which means getting up and down from the stool, and constantly moving it along to attach the wall and awning to the next section. Anyways, business started happening before I had completed my setting up, which is good, considering tourist traffic is significantly down.

A local young man bought “Hair Accessories” for his partner that loves black cockatoos. They are regular visitors where they live, as they are at my house, on the Eastern Shore of Hobart. Next a couple from Hobart visited and she bought two zipper pouches, one for a gift and the other for herself, along with a large “Salamanca Saturdays” tote bag. Another Hobartian purchased a small “Hanging Out” tote bag for her young niece and a grandmother bought an “Afternoon Siesta” greeting card for her 5 year old granddaughter, Fifi, living in France. Christmas cards, destined for various locations around the world: Norway, USA, and the UK, to name a few, were purchased today too.

A “Lazy Days” tote bag was purchased for a friend that is besotted with wombats. This friend stayed at a hotel that had an adopted wombat that wandered in and out of the hotel and this is where her passion was really fuelled.

Lazy Days tote bag (washable and Australian made) https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags/products/tote-bag-lazy-days-1

There were heaps of people from Queensland at the market. The border opened and many have taken advantage of it. Another “Lazy Days” tote bag was purchased. A young couple from Brisbane purchased a set of prints: “Hammock Life,” “Afternoon Siesta” and “Devilish Siesta”. Their yard backs onto a bush reserve and these prints fit in with their animal/nature theme of their house’s décor.

A worker from the Royal Hobart Hospital, thankful that she doesn’t have to wear a mask today because she wears it each day at work (but that will be changing next week, we’ve been told that we must wear masks) purchased a framed Christmas Siesta.

My thoughts are with all those affected by the 11/9 attack.

Take care, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Salamanca Market August 28, 2021

It was a rather slow-moving day at the market on Saturday but there was a lot to be thankful for. The sun, and not the wind, was out, and there were no driverless vehicles on the move. Last week, a van was left in neutral without the handbrake on and the van rolled into my next-door neighbour’s gazebo.

The morning started off with “Suspended” being purchased by a lady who informed me that it was going to hang in her boat.

A lady, visiting from Queensland, bought a cushion cover, “Hanging Out”.

Another visitor from Queensland, Noosa, bought a “Silent Disco” print.

Fairy Penguins enjoying a Silent Disco
https://pjpaintings.com/collections/musical

Three girlfriends from the northwest coast of Tassie, helped one choose an A-3 sized print of “Glamour Girls”. She wants to hang it above her bathtub. A local Hobartian, who collects fairy wren items, purchased a “Meet Me at the Gate” print. A “Meet Me at the Gate” framed print was also purchased by another Hobart resident.

A couple purchased a “Bunk beds”, “Hanging Out” and “Devilish Siesta” to hang up in their Bed & Breakfast accommodation in St. Helen’s, Tasmania. At the very end of the day, during packing up, there were two couples buying similar sets of prints, but I didn’t have the opportunity to chat much, but I do know that one was a graphic designer. I was quite keen to depart as soon as I could to get home, unpack the car, and get changed to go see the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra play Beethoven IV. https://www.tso.com.au It was a wonderful concert. 😊

Keep well, Pj Paintings

Anthill parrot

The beautifully coloured Golden-Shouldered parrot is listed as Endangered. It is said that there are more Golden-Shouldered parrots in birdcages than in the wild. Nearly a century after the extinction of the paradise parrot, there are conservation efforts taking place to protect the survival of its cousin, the Golden-Shouldered parrot. https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/golden-shouldered-parrot

The Golden-Shouldered parrot was found across most of the Cape York Peninsula, Australia, but now it is only found in an area of approximately 3,000 km2.

A Golden-shouldered Parrot poised for action. Photo Geoffrey Jones (BarraImaging.com.au).

The choice of the Golden-shouldered Parrots’ nesting site is unusual. They nest in conical termite mounds. The Golden-shouldered Parrots are also known as antbed or anthill parrots. They make their nests just after the wet season, when the termite mounds are soft enough for them to excavate. The mounds insulate the chicks on cold nights, but their timing must be just right – if termites are still active, they can cover over the nest entrances, or kill the eggs by cementing them to the bottom of the nest. Survival is a difficult business!

Grazing by cattle and feral pigs exacerbates the plight of the Golden-shouldered Parrots. They require suitably old (30-50 years) termite mounds to nest in. As such, the loss of, or damage to these crucial nesting sites has an impact on their population.

This Golden-shouldered Parrot that I painted is part of a larger painting. I painted a variety of Australian birds in one painting, but I wanted this blog post to feature and focus just on the Golden-shouldered Parrots. How can you not but relish that gorgeous turquoise colour!! It’s an amazing bird, as all birds are.

The Golden-shouldered parrot

I hope that you are keeping well and safe.

Warm regards, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

http://www.pjpaintings.com

Newest Member

I would like to introduce the newest member to the sleepy head series, this precious little fellow.

Taking it Easy

The painting is titled “Taking it Easy” and it is also available as a limited-edition print at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats.

I painted this wombat in a green-blue coloured hammock so that it would match with Spiky Bunk Beds, which is also available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats

Spiky bunk beds

I hope you enjoy the newest edition to the Sleepy head series.

Take care everybody, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Salamanca Market, August 14, 2021

As I write this post, on Sunday morning, it is raining and the Derwent River is awash with white caps, which makes me feel even more thankful for yesterday’s calm and mild conditions. Due to the ideal winter weather conditions of yesterday, there were more people out and about.

My first customers at the stall were three sisters, meeting up in Tassie, where one of the sister lives, to celebrate a sister’s birthday. One purchased a “Salamanca Fresh” tote bag and another bought an A-4 sized print of “Meet Me at the Gate” for her friend’s Christmas present. They meet at the gate to go walking together and she loves fairy wrens. A gift tailored for the individual!

“Salamanca Fresh” capturing a lively Salamanca Market day scene
“Meet Me at the Gate”

Then I met a locum nuclear medicine specialist doing a stint at the hospital here but because of the lockdowns he was not going home for his few weeks off. His daughter, who lives and teaches in the ACT, takes teenagers scuba diving, climbing Mt Kosciuszko and the like to teach them resilience, teamwork, build confidence and many other valuable life skills, loves whales. https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/snowy-mountains/kosciuszko-national-park/summit-walk

“Southern Flow”

He bought “Southern Flow” and “Weightless” prints for her. I didn’t get his name, but he also has a sole business selling shooting equipment. He represented Australia twice in the Olympics and a few times in the Commonwealth Games. I imagine it was in the Men’s trap shooting??

Weightless

A couple from central Queensland, their first visit to Tasmania, also bought a “Weightless” print and they bought one of my mini sketches of an Arthur Circus cottage. https://theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/2017/06/25/where-are-the-clowns/ They are here for a week. They have visited Richmond, Mona and were going to Bruny Island in the afternoon. https://theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/2017/10/13/bruny-island/

A couple from Newcastle purchased “Sitting on the Fence”. He loves kookaburras.

“Sitting on the Fence”

A man, who lives six months of the year in France, in the countryside of the Nouvelle Aquitaine area, purchased a small “Scarlet Robins” tote bag. https://www.britannica.com/place/Aquitaine.

“Scarlet Robins” made in Australia and washable tote bag

A couple from Townsville bought a “Richmond Bridge” and a “Silent Disco” print. A young lady, looking for a gift for her girlfriend, who lives in the Richmond, Tasmania area, bought her a “Two to Tango” tote bag. This is another tailored made gift because this girlfriend has a male and female emu as pets!! Their names are Ernie and Bert! 😊 Emus as pets are unusual pets but having emu pets in Tasmania is even more unusual because they are not endemic to Tasmania. The emus Tasmania used to have, have been extinct for over 100 years. https://theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/2020/02/03/the-study-of-emu-poo/

“Two to Tango”

I was pretty keen on packing up and getting away as soon as the gates opened. I was making good time and everything was fitting back into the car quite well and when I finished, I saw my gazebo standing there trying to look inconspicuous. Arg. I had to unpack half the car to pack it again, then got home and unpacked again and then headed out to the Welcome Swallow Brewery’s opening celebrations. https://www.welcomeswallow.com.au/ It’s an awesome venue and space. It was a great evening with amazing tasting boutique beer, made from Nigel’s homegrown, organic hops and raspberries.

I hope that you are staying warm and safe inside this week.

Cheers from, Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Limited edition prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

Salamanca Market July 31, 2021

It was a mild start to the day and then the rains came. Thankfully it passed. With various states across Australia in lockdowns, the numbers were significantly down at Salamanca Market.

The first sale of the day was a greeting card by a lady visiting from Brisbane. Then a couple visiting from Queensland bought two medium-sized pouches, one for their 4-year-old granddaughter’s birthday. They purchased a “Salamanca Fresh” and “Family Outing” pouch.

Salamanca Fresh pouch
Family Outing

A young man stopped by, freshly off a deep-sea research ship back from exploring/researching Australia’s deep-sea Indian Ocean Territories. The ship that docked a few days ago in Hobart. https://museumsvictoria.com.au/article/investigatingtheiot/ They have identified many new species: some blind and/or faceless species and many new crustations. He showed me some of his photos of the newly discovered species. He purchased a “Bunk beds” and “Sea Life” print.

Bunk beds
Sea Life

A couple chose a “Double Date” print for their mother. Another couple, from Brisbane, purchased a “Sea Life” and “Silent Disco” print. Brisbane is going into a three-day lock-down, so they are going to stay longer in Tassie.

Fairy Penguins enjoying a Silent Disco

A mother and daughter bought a Large “Helping Hands” pouch and a Medium sized “Hanging Out” tote bag. A couple from Queensland are taking an A-3 size “House sharing” print back with them.

Helping Hands pouch available at the market and http://www.pjpaintings.com

A family from Brisbane purchased three prints for their baby’s room: “Fairy wrens”, “Scarlet Robins” and “Weightless”.  A lady bought a “Bunk beds” print for a birthday gift for a girlfriend that lives in Brisbane. A lady, from Queensland, bought three prints of the Glamour Girls series for herself and her girlfriends.

Fairy wrens
Scarlet Robins
Weightless

At the end of the day, while I was packing up, a daughter and her mother, expecting her third child, chose a “Bunk beds” and “Sea Life” print. She’s having her baby in Tasmania and then they are returning to Fiji, where they live.

After packing up the market stall and then unpacking the car when I arrived home, I got changed into 60’s outfit to go to my friend’s 60th birthday party. The music was so much fun to dance to!

Celebrating Sixty Style

Wishing everybody a good upcoming fortnight.

Thanks for visiting! All print, tote bag and pouch images shown are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Cheers, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.