Allen’s Rivulet Track

There’s no better way to start a new year than a walk in nature.  It’s calming and soothing.  I started the new year with a walk in Allen’s Rivulet, Tasmania, Australia.

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On the way to the track, I came across this comical character.

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The track takes you through Tasmanian bush, passed a large hollow living tree, to a rivulet and back onto the street.

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One of the views from inside the tree
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The middle large tree trunk in the photo has the hollow base
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Allen’s Rivulet Track’s hollow tree

It reminded me of the most famous and photographed tree in Vancouver, Canada, the Hollow Tree in Stanley Park, which I have played in many times as a child.

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Stanley Park’s Hollow Tree

It is arguably the most famous tourist attraction in Vancouver for over 100 years.  There are many historical photos of this tree.

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A 1917 photo of the Duke of Devenshire and dignitaries

 

Unlike Allen’s Rivulet’s hollow tree, which is a living tree, the Stanley Park one is a 600 to 800 year old Western Red Cedar tree that died, but left a huge hollow stump.  In 2006, there was a severe windstorm that caused significant damage to many trees, including the famous Hollow Tree, causing it to lean precariously.  The Vancouver Parks Board considered taking it down but there was a massive public outcry resulting in some ingenuity to save the tree.

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The brace installed to help keep the stump stable and upright

I spotted this most unique little nest too!

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A Grey fantail in its nest

The nest is really small, the size of a tiny cup and it had the mum bird, a Grey fantail, sitting in it.  Most of her body is outside the nest because the nest is so small.  A bird book describes the nest as looking “like a wine glass without a base – a tiny cup of plant fibres liberally bound with cobweb.”

Thanks for stopping by. I wish one and all an awesome upcoming new year!

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Snug Falls

Snug Falls is a beautiful high waterfall on Snug River in Tasmania’s south.  It’s a 2.1km walk to the falls, about a half hour walk one way.  We haven’t had too much rain lately so the waterfall was subdued but still beautiful, peaceful and a nice escape from the heat of the day.

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Snug Falls
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Rachel cooling her feet while admiring the waterfall and serenity

While my friend, Rachel, cooled her feet in the water and was gazing upwards at the waterfall, I did a 2 minute line drawing of her.

On our way back to the car we stopped to pick and eat some Native Cherries, which are ripe at this time of year.  They’re a little woody in texture but really tasty.  Its botanical name is Exocarpos cupressiformis.  It has no relation to the European cherry and its fruit is actually swollen red stalk.  It is a parasite on the roots of other trees and therefore very difficult to transplant.

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Native Cherry or sometimes called Cherry Ballart or Cypress Cherry. Its botanical name is Exocarpos cupressifromis.

Thanks for stopping by. 🙂