Enchanted Forest II

I painted an Australian forest scene that was purchased when I posted the painting on my Instagram account (https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/).

One of the birds featured in the painting is the Golden-shouldered parrot that I wrote about in an earlier blog post: https://wordpress.com/post/theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com/6302

Another bird that is seriously struggling that is included in this painting is the Orange-bellied parrot, one of only a few migratory parrot species in the world and it is listed as critically endangered. The parrots breed in Melaleuca, on the west coast of Tasmania, feeding on button grass seeds and fly to the south east of mainland Australia in the winter. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/orange-bellied-parrot/ and https://birdlife.org.au/projects/orange-bellied-parrot-recovery

Another species facing an upward struggle, and also is listed as endangered, is the Tasmanian devil. https://www.zoo.org.au/fighting-extinction/local-threatened-species/tasmanian-devil/ and https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/tassie-devils. European settlers named them Tasmanian devils because of their skin-crawling, night-time howling. Tasmanian devils are smallish in size but look quite menacing when they open their large mouths and bare their teeth. Their strong jaws enable them to munch through bones with ease.

Enchanted Forest II

Birds from top left to right are a: Gouldian finch, Yellow-throated honeyeater, Boobook owl, Magpie, Wattle bird, Orange-bellied parrot, Sugar glider, Golden-shouldered parrot, New Holland honeyeater, Spotted-tail quoll and Tasmanian devil.

I hope that you are able to enjoy time in an enchanted forest near to wherever you are living and that efforts to save species are achieving successes.

Take care, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

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Day light robbery

Today at Salamanca Market was a mixed bag, weather-wise and event wise. A sudden downpour of rain damaged three frames and caused chaos for me to trying to secure and quickly move things undercover. Then I had a visit from the police, a shoplifter had been reported, and she had items from several stall holders, including two PJ Paintings prints. I didn’t know or see her take anything. Later in the day two more prints were stolen. They weren’t returned. It’s near impossible to be doing credit card transactions, bagging or wrapping frames, and watching hands handling prints. The spirit of giving is unanimous with Christmas but I suppose that it also gives rise to the spirit of stealing. It’s disappointing because as a stall holder you want to be able relax, enjoy meeting and conversing with people. I like giving eye contact, not having to watch what people behind the ones you’re serving, are doing.

Has anyone else had artwork stolen? How did you feel about it?

I sold some “Tassie Christmas” greeting cards to a couple visiting from Germany.

Xmas Tree 7sml
Tassie Christmas

A “Bunk beds” and “Afternoon Siesta” print is being posted to two little Australian girls living in the UK.

The original “Christmas Siesta” painting was purchased and will be journeying to California, USA.

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Christmas Siesta

Her friend bought two prints that are also U.S. bound, “Hanging Out” and “Spiky bunk beds.”

Two young ladies from Germany, living and studying at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, bought a “Bunk beds” print. A young couple visiting from Melbourne bought “Hair Accessories” and “The Bun”. A framed “The Bun” had sold earlier in the day too.

A lady from Bendigo bought my small original painting of a Galah. It is going to hang in her toilet room beside a picture of nasturtiums, I was told.

galah smlAug31
Galah

A three year old boy is going to receive a small framed “Family Outing” for his birthday. She was going to buy him a T-shirt but when she saw the framed print, she changed her mind.

Family Outing Ixsml
Family Outing IV

I didn’t quite escape a late burst of rain with a short peppering of hail at the end of the day when I was half way through packing up. I was glad to get home, have a cup of tea with my feet up after bringing everything in and hanging things to dry in various places all around the inside of the house.

The most popular prints today were the wombats from the Sleepy head series.

A thought to ponder: “Our primary function is to create an emotion and our secondary function is to sustain that emotions”. Alfred Hitchcock

Wishing you an awesome and creative upcoming week,
from Pj Paintings, stall #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania
P.S. Tote bags & pouches are available at www.pjpaintings.com