Newest Member

I would like to introduce the newest member to the sleepy head series, this precious little fellow.

Taking it Easy

The painting is titled “Taking it Easy” and it is also available as a limited-edition print at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats.

I painted this wombat in a green-blue coloured hammock so that it would match with Spiky Bunk Beds, which is also available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats

Spiky bunk beds

I hope you enjoy the newest edition to the Sleepy head series.

Take care everybody, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Platypus

A new Tasmanian member is getting ready to join the hammock series!

Initial starting to come to life beginning
Feeling more secure now that the hammock isn’t invisible

Liking the surrounds of gum flowers and leaves
Please finish my tail, the side of me and the leaves below the hammock.

Yes, Platty-Platypus, I’ll try to finish it all as soon as I can!

I hope that everybody’s week is going well and that you’re finding time to relax and enjoy life too.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

Salamanca Market Update, May 8, 2021

Salamanca Market was quieter than a fortnight ago. I think that people went to Agfest, which was held in the north of the state. Nevertheless, it was busy at the PJ Paintings stall.

I had a young man, around the age of 10, choose “Emus can Fly!” for his Mum’s Mother’s Day present. She rides a motorbike. He asked me if I had any pictures of skeletons. Apparently, she really likes motorcycles and skeletons. The dad said it’s true and that Mother’s Day is interesting at their house. She sounds like a cool mother!

Emus can Fly!
available at www.pjpaintings.com

Two ladies visiting from Narooma, NSW, which I had to look up to know where that is, https://www.aussietowns.com.au/town/narooma-nsw purchased a cushion cover of “Hair Accessories” and a “Salamanca Saturdays” print.

Hair Accessories
available at www.pjpaintings.com

Three young ladies from Sydney, one originally from the Ukraine, bought some wombat and unfurling prints. One of the three kept referring to it as a koala, so eventually I said, “I’m sorry to say but it’s a wombat.” She laughed and really thought it was funny. I assured her, she is not the first because you are much more likely to see a koala than a wombat in a tree, actually, you will never see a wombat in a tree! Anyways, she’s decided to name the wombat “koala”.

Afternoon Siesta
available at www.pjpaintings.com

Two young ladies, one from Townsville and the other from Brisbane, met in Brisbane to fly here to have a Tassie holiday together. They bought “Iconic Aussies”.

Iconic Aussies
available at www.pjpaintings.com

A couple visiting from Brisbane, asked if I had a single Yellow-sulphur cockatoo painting because they have a pet one at home named Charley-barley. (I had a dog that we called Charli-warli!) They bought “Double Date” and “Lazy Days” zipper pencil cases.

Lazy Days pencil case, available in small, medium and large sizes at http://www.pjpaintings.com

A lady, from Queensland, dropped by to tell me that she bought “Salamanca Fresh” and “Richmond Bridge” prints two years ago and that everybody that comes to her house always comments on how much they like them. That warmed my heart.

Salamanca Fresh available at www.pjpaintings.com

Lovely Olivia, doing her first year of university in Tassie, studying Marine and Antarctic Science bought a greeting card. She does watercolour paintings too and showed me some of her sea animal paintings. They are stunning. She is hoping that she will be able to combine the two passions by doing scientific illustrations.

A couple from Mt Gambia, South Australia, bought “Hanging Out”. He said, “there are too many people here. It’s lovely and peaceful in Mt Gambia.” With COVID restrictions there are only about one fourth of the usual amount of people allowed in the market, so it’s good he experienced the seriously less populous market.

Hanging Out
available at www.pjpaintings.com

A young lady is sending a “Salamanca Saturday” print to the UK to her dad for his birthday. For their first baby’s nursery, parents bought “Lazy Days”, “Spiky Bunk Beds” and “The Three Amigos” prints. Another couple bought “What the Devil!?” and “Bunk beds” prints for their children’s bedrooms.

What the Devil!?
prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

It was a fun and interactive day at the market. I’ll be back in a fortnight. Until then, take good care of yourselves during this challenging time of living with a pandemic.

From PJ Paintings

Sold

The final original painting, titled “Afternoon Siesta”, of my Sleepy head series has sold. A young lady, from Sydney, visiting Tasmania, saw my artwork at Artefacts Inc Gallery https://www.salarts.org.au/portfolio/residents/artefacts_inc/ She bought three prints, including Afternoon Siesta, and returned home.

Artefacts Gallery in the Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania

About a week later, she phoned me because she couldn’t get Afternoon Siesta out of her head. She was so excited about making the decision to buy it. It’s her first original art purchase. She’s originally from Norway, and has lived in Belgium and France too and now she’s living in Sydney, Australia.

Afternoon Siesta

We agreed that this wombat is the most relaxed looking of the wombats that I have painted. I can’t help but feel more relaxed whenever I look at this painting. It looks like every single bit of stress has dripped out of its paws. Now, it’s on its way to its new owner.

High quality prints of Afternoon Siesta are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats/products/sleepy-head-series-afternoon-siesta-a-print-of-a-wombat

I hope that your day and week has been feeling pretty relaxing too.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

Success

I am basically a self-taught watercolour artist. About 12 years ago, I started taking evening Adult Ed classes, when I worked full-time. I have kept practicing and trying to improve my drawing and painting skills ever since.

I have submitted applications for local exhibitions, involving submitting a form, including a high-resolution gloss photograph when requested, and a non-refundable payment. I was so often rejected that I stopped applying. Unlike when you apply for a job, you can phone and ask why you weren’t asked to be interviewed and receive some constructive feedback. With the art application process, you usually aren’t allowed to engage with the judges, so you never find out if you were close to getting accepted, on the right track or are able to seek any kind of feedback to help you.

Rejection is discouraging and I think I briefly found myself skirting around the edges of Imposter Syndrome. Thankfully, for me, I focused on the people who do like and connect with my art, rather than those that don’t, and keep painting what I wanted to paint and I was able to avoid getting drawn into this misery. I can understand how Imposter Syndrome could easily suck you in and really damage your confidence.

I also think that my imagination helps me fight against this syndrome and negative art-self-talk because it is such a dominant and relentless force in my brain. It is always bombarding me with painting ideas. It produces way, way, way more ideas than I ever will be able to paint. So, I feel that my brain is forced to analyse, judge, sort and categorise painting ideas rather than dwell on “an internal experience of believing that you are not as competent as others perceive you to be”. This TED talk explains Imposter Syndrome or Imposter Phenomenon well https://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_cox_what_is_imposter_syndrome_and_how_can_you_combat_it?language=en and there are many articles explaining these commonly experienced feelings https://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud.

I realise that many people underestimate how challenging I find art and think that I can draw anything. Myth buster – there are many things that I simply can’t draw!!, which also could feed into Imposter Syndrome. I struggle with composition, drawing and I usually erase whatever I am trying to draw multiple times. I think if people watched me undertaking a painting from start to finish, that they would be seriously surprised. I am a serious believer that drawing can improve with practice. It is about enjoying trying (the journey), enjoying the end-products that are successful, trying to give as little time as possible to dwelling on those that aren’t, (after analysing them to try to avoid the same mistake/s next time) and enjoying the joy that art gives to the recipients.

A friend encouraged me to submit an application form to enter my painting, titled “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins” in the Waterways Exhibition to be held at the Long Gallery in the Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania. Reluctantly I did, and success! the painting has been accepted!!

Prints and tote bags of this painting are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

The Water Ways exhibition will open to the public at 10am on Friday 5th February at the Long Gallery, Salamanca Place, Tasmania and continues until Sunday 14th.

I hope that you are able to see the Water Ways exhibition and the original of “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ)

The Edge of the World

After staying overnight at Arthur’s River, on Tasmania’s northwest coast, and before making my way to Corinna, I was almost blown off the “Edge of the World”!!

beaches littered with logs at The Edge of the World, Tasmania

The Edge of the World is a wild and bleak place with relentless, grey-blue, angry waves, as evidenced by large amounts, and large-in-size, debris littering the beaches. It is beautiful to stand, feel and see the power and ruggedness of the ocean and its shores absorbing the constant mercilessness of it.

The view at The Edge of the Word, Gardiner Point, Tasmania

The ocean from this point to Argentina is the longest uninterrupted stretch of ocean on Earth. Inscribed on a stone plinth at the Edge is a poem written by tourism pioneer Brian Inder (Dec 1930- Aug 2019) describing the feeling of standing at this spot, being in awe of the surroundings, and reflecting that we are all little more than a speck in the spectrum of time.

Brian Inder is a well-admired in the Tasmanian northwest tourism industry, best known for founding Tasmazia & the Village of Lower Crackpot. https://www.tasmazia.com.au/ He was also pivotal in establishing Mural Fest, The Edge of the World and Mount Roland cableway.

The calmer side of the beach

This region is known as the Arthur-Pieman Conservation area. It was home to four Aboriginal clans: Peerapper, Monegin, Taskinener and Peternidic. We do not know how many people lived here before Europeans arrived. Within just 40 years, most tribal Aborigines died of European diseases while others were killed or exiled to Flinders Island.

The largest middens are in the northwest of Tasmania. Aboriginal shell middens are distinctive mounds that contain a rich history of past Aboriginal hunting, gathering and food processing activities. Discarded shells and bone, botanical remains, ash and charcoal tell the story that the Aboriginal feasted on different type of shellfish and seabirds. The women gathered shellfish and food plants, dived for abalone, lobster and were experts at hunting seals. They dug themselves hiding spots in the cobble beaches, where they hid and waited until they saw the opportunity to pounce on an unsuspecting seal and clubbed it to death. In the early 1800s, some European sealers and whalers took Aboriginal women to help them catch seals. Some of today’s Tasmanian Aborigines have descended from these women’s relations with the sealers and whalers.

At the viewing platform there are informative information plaques

There were many little birds darting around in the bushes along the path back to the car park.

A male Superb fairy-wren
Resting place for displaced logs at the Edge of the World, Tasmania

Thank you for visiting.

Magical Corinna

I have been living in Tasmania for 25 years and have not properly explored the north west coast of the island and there are so many hidden gems! One being Corinna. All the accommodation in Corinna (it’s a popular destination!) was booked out weeks in advance, so I was only able to spend a day there. https://corinna.com.au/ It is a small, historical and isolated settlement (no wi-fi, petrol station, shops and the like) nestled along the Pieman River.

Corinna, once a thriving gold mining town, is rich with history and stories. Its ancient forests, originally housing Aboriginal hunter-gatherer society, now provides the backdrop to a largely undisturbed village as when the Europeans explored and prospected here.

After a long and bumpy drive from Arthur River, the first stop was the cafe, which is also the shop, accommodation reception, where you purchase barge ride tickets and more.

The one and only shop/cafe/reception and the like

From the window seat, I started to sketch the first cottage in view, which I later discovered was the Old Pub. I doesn’t look like what I imagine a pub would look like!

my sketch of the pub from the Corinna cafe
The Old Pub, Corinna Tasmania

Apparently it was quite a rowdy place!

After a meal, I started exploring Corinna on foot.

old petrol bowser
One of the many accommodation cottages
The Butcher Shop that is next door to the Old Pub
Another shot of the Butcher Shop. It has the coolest chimney!
The Butcher Shop. I’ve never seen a chimney like this one!
some of the characters and stories of Corinna
The Great Western. The whole time I was drawing this building, there was a pademelon chomping away. It’s difficult to see in the photo, but it is on our right side of the building, in the grass.
I drew in the pademelon at The Great Western, Corinna

We did an hour and a half walk in the beautiful Tarkine Rainforest and visited a patch where the crayfish burrow. There are boat cruises, canoeing and more adventures to be had in Corinna. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/regions-of-tasmania/west-coast/corinna

crayfish burrows

Then it was sadly time to depart, using the Fatman Barge transport novelty ($28 per car). It only fits two vehicles at a time on it, less if they are pulling a boat or trailer.

The only Stop sign in Corinna
Corinna humour
The barge coming to collect us
being transported across Pieman River. Bye-bye Corinna 😦

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you enjoyed the short tour of Corinna, Tasmania.

Cheers from Patricia Hopwood-Wade http://www.pjpaintings.com

More information about Corinna, Tasmania

Missing Feet

Eight more penguins to paint

Progress is being made… I still have more penguins to paint, detail to add, not to mention the dreaded background! There are also several penguins with missing feet, including the wombat that needs his foot painted too.

Six more penguins to go!

The missing feet on this painting is not something sinister or mysterious and will soon be rectified, unlike the twenty detached human feet that have washed up on the shores around Vancouver and Vancouver Island, Canada, since 2007. The mystery around these feet, which at one time were thought to be originating from a funeral home, but investigations have since confirmed that the feet come from people who have unfortunately died. The feet detach by the normal decomposition process. The feet were usually found in sneakers. Coroners postulate that the sneakers helped to give the feet buoyancy, enough to eventually be washed ashore, and gave the feet protection from decomposition that helped them to remain relatively intact. The feet have been able to provide some closure for families by DNA matching with the National Missing Persons data base.

I’m going to make a point of enjoying my feet today! I hope that you can too.

Kind regards, from PJ Paintings

Please visit my website for a browse at: http://www.pjpaintings.com

Fairy penguins

I didn’t get much time to paint today but I did add one more fairy penguin to my picture.

Eventually all twenty will be painted. This painting that I’m working on is telling a story similar to that of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, but an Tasmanian-ised version. Here in Tasmania, there are no bears, not even koala “bears”, who aren’t bears, rather they are marsupials, so they can quite easily be discounted from this story. But there are our regular fairy penguin visitors, the smallest species of penguins.

You can imagine the surprise when twenty fairy penguins waddle up the beach to discover a wombat in their nest!! (I haven’t drawn the nest as of yet).

I’ll keep bringing more penguins to life over the next few days. Take care and thanks for stopping by, PJ Paintings

Four Iconic Australians

The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is native to Australia and Tasmania. I often see flocks of yellow-tailed black cockatoos swoop and fly around my house, announcing their arrival with their distinctive raucous call. It is an iconic and beautiful Australian bird and one that I am very fond of.

There is uncertainty whether galahs are native or not to Tasmania. Records show that they were here as early as the 1840s. I thought galahs were rather harmless and not causing too much trouble in Tasmania but it turns out that the north-west Tasmanian council wants to cull galahs!! Apparently they are “costly and dangerous” because large flocks are killing trees and gnawing powerlines around Ulverstone.

cockgalahsml
a yellow-tailed black cockatoo and a galah

The sulphur-crested cockatoo is also an iconic Australian bird and it has established itself in Tasmania. They are thought to have migrated over the Bass Strait under their own wing, and there is this same line of thought about galahs. They are a common sight in Tasmania. The sulphur-crested cockatoo is viewed as a pest by many farmers as large flocks regularly settle on fields of crops for a nice healthy feed.

cockatoosml
a sulphur-crested cockatoo

Kookaburras were introduced into Tasmania, in 1906, by humans, to try to reduce snake numbers.  The laughing birds were brought to Tasmania to eat snakes but they also eat native lizards and impact the native birds. They are nest robbers.

iconicaustralianssml

Despite two (or three?) of these four iconic Australian birds not being native to Tasmania, and worrying about Tasmania’s native species, I love seeing and hearing them. Birds are beautiful and I love them.

Take care from PJ Paintings

Prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com