A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.

Fitzroy Gardens

The Hobart Sketchers Group met at Fitzroy Gardens in South Hobart, Tasmania, today on this Day for Valentines. We had a nice group of ten gather at the beautiful and green gardens, including an urban sketcher from Launceston. kunanyi’s organ pipes were really well-marked and distinctive from this viewpoint. This mountain looks over Hobart and is a feature from many different angles depending which suburb you are viewing it from. The organ pipes could be so clearly seen from here.

our view of kunanyi

I decided to sketch a house on Fitzroy Crescent, number 43. I had a clear view of the house until a car parked in front of me.

and I really liked their street-light arrangement of the bins at the front of the house!!
The house with car parking in front of me. Ahhh, my bins are out of view now!!

Then the owner of the house wandered across the street to have a bit of a sticky beak and was so enthusiastic about what we were doing and our drawings that he moved the car, rubbish bins and even offered to make us a cup of coffee!

He saw my drawing at this stage

Then he offered to take a photo of me drawing. I think it is quite a cool shot with the house so clearly in view. He’s got a photographer’s eye!

Drawing 43 Fitzroy Crescent

I mucked up the bay windows. I didn’t draw them big enough. Next time…..

Finished sketch, with the rubbish bins!

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you make time to draw, drawing outdoors, indoors looking out or indoors looking in.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ Paintings)

Magical Corinna

I have been living in Tasmania for 25 years and have not properly explored the north west coast of the island and there are so many hidden gems! One being Corinna. All the accommodation in Corinna (it’s a popular destination!) was booked out weeks in advance, so I was only able to spend a day there. https://corinna.com.au/ It is a small, historical and isolated settlement (no wi-fi, petrol station, shops and the like) nestled along the Pieman River.

Corinna, once a thriving gold mining town, is rich with history and stories. Its ancient forests, originally housing Aboriginal hunter-gatherer society, now provides the backdrop to a largely undisturbed village as when the Europeans explored and prospected here.

After a long and bumpy drive from Arthur River, the first stop was the cafe, which is also the shop, accommodation reception, where you purchase barge ride tickets and more.

The one and only shop/cafe/reception and the like

From the window seat, I started to sketch the first cottage in view, which I later discovered was the Old Pub. I doesn’t look like what I imagine a pub would look like!

my sketch of the pub from the Corinna cafe
The Old Pub, Corinna Tasmania

Apparently it was quite a rowdy place!

After a meal, I started exploring Corinna on foot.

old petrol bowser
One of the many accommodation cottages
The Butcher Shop that is next door to the Old Pub
Another shot of the Butcher Shop. It has the coolest chimney!
The Butcher Shop. I’ve never seen a chimney like this one!
some of the characters and stories of Corinna
The Great Western. The whole time I was drawing this building, there was a pademelon chomping away. It’s difficult to see in the photo, but it is on our right side of the building, in the grass.
I drew in the pademelon at The Great Western, Corinna

We did an hour and a half walk in the beautiful Tarkine Rainforest and visited a patch where the crayfish burrow. There are boat cruises, canoeing and more adventures to be had in Corinna. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/regions-of-tasmania/west-coast/corinna

crayfish burrows

Then it was sadly time to depart, using the Fatman Barge transport novelty ($28 per car). It only fits two vehicles at a time on it, less if they are pulling a boat or trailer.

The only Stop sign in Corinna
Corinna humour
The barge coming to collect us
being transported across Pieman River. Bye-bye Corinna 😦

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you enjoyed the short tour of Corinna, Tasmania.

Cheers from Patricia Hopwood-Wade http://www.pjpaintings.com

More information about Corinna, Tasmania

Sketch-meet

On the second Sunday of each month, a small group of Hobartians, set up on footpaths of streets, parks, or the like, to do some urban sketching. This Sunday we sketched on New Town Rd with easy view of the old post office stores, Jackman & McRoss Bakery and Dispatch Cafe.

The old post office stores with Dispatch Cafe next to it
Post Office Stores – I drew firstly with a grey texta to try to help me not get too caught up in the detail.

There was about 10 minutes before we were to meet at Dispatch Cafe, so I used my grey texta and applied watercolour to do a very quick drawing of Jackman & McRoss Bakery.

An almost direct watercolour drawing
My view of the Cafe

We met at the Dispatch Cafe for a lively cuppa and throw down.

Mosaic in Dispatch Cafe

I took photos of the awesome mosaic in the washroom at Dispatch.

Three dimensional mosaic
Three dimensional mosaic made by Tanya La Paglia displayed at the Dispatch Cafe, which used to be the old post office which was officially opened on January 1, 1842.

I hope that you have a good week and keep the pen/s drawing.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings http://www.pjpaintings.com

An Early Birthday Present

I’ve started celebrating my birthday a week early by meeting up with friends to sketch, followed by lunch. I was royally spoiled by receiving a painting of hedges (special significance because a while ago we went around photographing hedges of substance in New Town) and a smooth flowing, beautiful handling fude pen.

My birthday treat: urban sketching, a painting and a pen that will be treasured. I used it to sketch today and it was soooooo nice handling.

We went to Bedford Street, New Town, Tasmania to sketch, which apparently was named after Eleanor Bedford, who was the wife of somebody who subdivided the land in the 1840s. For an interesting read about New Town’s street name history check out this article: http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2011/05/20/3222620.htm

This house was built in 1905.

One of the many substantial houses on Bedford Street, New Town and the house I chose to draw

Roseville, on the other side of the street, is a huge, ornate house.

Roseville, Bedford Street

It is rare that I draw and paint a picture in plein air. Usually I do the drawing outside and the painting inside, but this time I did it all outside in the breeze and while the birds tweeted the entire time. The tweet-tweets from the birds helped to make it feel really relaxing.

my sketch of a house built in 1905

I have planned a few other events that involve drawing for my birthday . Fun-fun, here I come!

Take care and I hope you’re able to carve some fun activities into this week.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings http://www.pjpaintings.com

North Hobart

I had a coffee with a friend in North Hobart, yesterday. While my friend was finishing a phone call, I did a very quick sketch of this house.

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There are so many gorgeous Federation houses in North Hobart.

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I leaned on the railing to do my drawing of this house above

I must get myself out drawing more!

Beautiful Collinsvale

I had an appointment in Collinsvale, Tasmania. I thought it would take about an hour to get there, but it only took 27 minutes! Collinsvale feels like a whole different world, like you’re in the wilderness, but it’s so close to the city (closer than I remembered!).

Collinsvalecountryside
The road through the countryside of Collinsvale

The beauty about being an urban sketcher is that if you’re early, or if the person you’re meeting is late, you always have something productive to do with your time. I parked in front of this house, which is located on the main street, just after the primary school, and sketched it.

Collinsvale house

I approached sketching it in my usual manner by firstly drawing the big shapes with a water colour pencil, then inking it with a Fude ink pen and then adding the washes. Liz Steel has often said that drawing too much roof is a common error, one that I frustratingly find myself repeatedly doing. I have to try to keep this in the forefront of my mind. I think if you can nail the roof, then the rest of the structure more accurately reflects the real life building’s perspectives and sizes of the different sections. What is your urban sketching Achilles’ Heel?  

Collinsvalesml
My sketch

I really couldn’t see what was happening with the front door. I think it had stained glass but I was too far away to be able to see.

It was lovely to re-visit Collinsvale. I hope that one day you are able to take the small detour from Hobart and visit this quaint suburb.

Stay safe and thanks for stopping by.

A Different Door

A walk around the neighbourhood, with the specific goal of photographing different coloured doors, delivered a surprising revelation. It is true that there are more conservatively coloured doors in my neighbourhood, predominantly cream or wood colour, but I was surprised at how many people have stepped out of the conservative door mind-frame and have dared to be a bit risqué.

I spotted yellow, dark grey, grey, cream and burgandy, lime green, red, orange-red and more coloured doors.

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My cream coloured door

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My quick sketch of a rather dull entrance

My door is a cream colour and I’ve always wanted a red door. Apparently in early America, red doors were a sign of welcome to passing horses and buggy travellers, and a sign of a safe house on the Underground Railroad. Also, it is said that vibrant red doors reflect vibrancy, liveliness and excitement inside the house.

The quarantine measures have spurred me into a clean-up and re-organising mode, like many people have been using this time to do long awaited jobs around the house, and while the momentum was still present…. Ta-da! I now have a red door!

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My newly painted red door 🙂

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my sketch of a more vibrant and welcoming entry

Do you have a different coloured door? I’d love it if you would email me a photo of it (pjpaintings@gmail.com) and I will add it to this blog post. It can be a living and breathing door-photo collecting vessel!

Thanks for stopping by.

Take care and be safe, from PJ Paintings

More Indoor-urban Sketching

During the Coronavirus lock-down there have been record sales for some items, besides toilet paper. There’s been a surge in guitar and ukulele sales, bicycles and exercise gear, outdoor and indoor games, books, electrical goods (laptops, headphones and etc) and for those now working at home and not having office supplied coffee, coffee sales has increased.

Personally, I’ve been having a surge in re-organising and cleaning out neglected areas of my house. I’ve set up my art room yesterday, so hopefully soon, I’ll have a surge of paintings and drawings!

I moved a two and three seater couch up onto the footpath (they both went within 24 hours).

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I wanted to downsize the furniture and create a lighter feel in my lounge room. Once that was set up, I painted a corner of the lounge room. I used my usual approach, first sketching the shapes with a watercolour pencil, then ink (this time an Artline pen) and then paint.

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My finished indoor-urban sketch

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My Tante Yvette, who lives in Armstrong, B.C., Canada, made this wall hanging quilt that is hanging in the stairwell for me. The previous owners of this house added the stairs. Before the indoor stairs were built, to access the ground floor, you would have to go outside and use the downstairs door. There are several houses along this street with this design.

I would love to hear how you are spending your extra hours at home.

Thanks for visiting, PjPaintings