Urban Sketch

I felt so inspired and motivated when I left the house but once I arrived at our monthly Hobart urban sketch meet, the inspiration had exited somewhere along the way. I wandered around looking and discounting buildings: too complicated, will take too long, too exposed to the wind, too cold, no where to sit and more excuses were applied to the various sites under consideration.

I finally settled on drawing the entrance of the newly opened hotel on Murray Street, in the city. I drew it standing up with my book awkwardly balancing on my open left hand. The unsteadiness of the book contributed to looseness and wobbliness of the lines. Usually I avoid including cars, but because this one was blocking part of the view of the entrance, I felt compelled to attempt drawing it.

My approximately half an hour drawing of 12 Murray Street, Hobart, Tasmania
I drew some loose guide lines with a watercolour pencil and then drew the rest with a Fude pen.

Wishing you an inspiring week.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

Hastings Street, Noosa

Hastings Street, Noosa, in Queensland, is lined with shops, cafes, restaurants and galleries, with trees wrapped in fairy lights in the centre boulevards. This tree dwarfed the shops behind it. The leafy cover is wider than it is tall.

Hastings Street in Noosa.

This tree came complete with some Australian Brushturkeys scratching and foraging around its base.

One of the many Australian Brushturkeys making themselves at home on the streets of Noosa. We saw a young one too. A little cutie.

I hope that your day is going well where you are.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

An Australian Brushturkey foraging on Hastings Street, Noosa.

Noosa

On my first day in Noosa, Queensland, I walked the neighbourhood in search of a house to sketch. Most houses in this area are hidden behind tall fences! It took a while to find this house, which I sketched on location and partly inked (using the beautiful Fude pen Kim gifted me) before it started showering. Nothing like the threat of rain to help you develop speed-drawing! 🙂

A hard to find unfenced house in Noosa
My rendition of the un-fenced Noosa house. I focused on the lush greenery. The lighter tree at the front of the house is a frangipani.
I sat beside this very funky cactus with similar flowers to the frangipani to sketch the house across the street.
There are plenty of Pandanus Palms on the outside of fences. I like their sculptural root system.
Currawongs were knocking down and feeding on the Pandanus Palms’ fruit.
A spotted pawpaw tree
There are rainbow lorikeets in Tasmania but they seem to be plumper in Queensland.
Two of commonly sighted noisy Rainbow Lorikeets
and also often sighted; cute, small lizards

Living in these uncertain times, I treasure being able to go out, sketch and enjoy nature. I hope that the population in Ukraine, and everywhere around the world, will soon be able too.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings

A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Urban Sketch-meet

We had a lively and happy sketch-meet today in the suburb of North Hobart, followed by a throw-down at the Providence Cafe. I chose to sketch this scene. The bright blue front door was a strong feature that caught my eye.

houses near Newdegate Street, North Hobart, Tasmania

My viewpoint for the sketch:

Take care and thank you for sharing my art journeying. 🙂

Patricia (PJ)

Urban sketching in North Hobart

For today’s urban sketch meet we met at a funky little cafe in North Hobart called Pigeon Hole Cafe. Our small group of eight sketchers dispersed and drew a variety of buildings and houses. The hills and slopes added an extra level of perspective-challenge.

A church built into the slope across the street from the cafe where we met

I chose to undertake this challenge on Goulburn Street. I liked that I could see a little of kunanyi/Mt Wellington just peeking over the roof of the building.

building built in 1924 on Goulburn Street, North Hobart, Tasmania

This is what I drew and started painting outside before I decided it was time to seek warmth and a well deserved cup of coffee.

plein air

…. and the finished wonky attempt.

a Goulburn Street building

I hope that everybody has had a lovely weekend and wish you an equally lovely upcoming week.

Thanks for dropping in for a read. Cheers, Patricia (PJ)

Fitzroy Gardens

The Hobart Sketchers Group met at Fitzroy Gardens in South Hobart, Tasmania, today on this Day for Valentines. We had a nice group of ten gather at the beautiful and green gardens, including an urban sketcher from Launceston. kunanyi’s organ pipes were really well-marked and distinctive from this viewpoint. This mountain looks over Hobart and is a feature from many different angles depending which suburb you are viewing it from. The organ pipes could be so clearly seen from here.

our view of kunanyi

I decided to sketch a house on Fitzroy Crescent, number 43. I had a clear view of the house until a car parked in front of me.

and I really liked their street-light arrangement of the bins at the front of the house!!
The house with car parking in front of me. Ahhh, my bins are out of view now!!

Then the owner of the house wandered across the street to have a bit of a sticky beak and was so enthusiastic about what we were doing and our drawings that he moved the car, rubbish bins and even offered to make us a cup of coffee!

He saw my drawing at this stage

Then he offered to take a photo of me drawing. I think it is quite a cool shot with the house so clearly in view. He’s got a photographer’s eye!

Drawing 43 Fitzroy Crescent

I mucked up the bay windows. I didn’t draw them big enough. Next time…..

Finished sketch, with the rubbish bins!

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you make time to draw, drawing outdoors, indoors looking out or indoors looking in.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ Paintings)

Opossum Bay

I love Opossum Bay, located in southern Tasmania. I feel like I’ve travelled to another part of the world but it’s only about a 25 minute drive from my house, and the drive is picturesque too.

I love the shape of the bay and I love what this resident has made from random, lost thongs found on the beach! What an awesome and creative idea.
a photo from the other direction

The stand-out house for me at Opossum Bay is this quirky lighthouse house. Through the darkened lower windows you can catch glimpse of a large wooden boat with a mermaid-like figurehead. It looks impressive from a distance so I can only imagine how much more so close up.

my favourite house along the beach

I was keen to try to draw the lighthouse house. I struggled with the perspective but it was still fun to try.

My sketch

There were a variety of seagulls enjoying the bay too.

Thanks for visiting and stay safe.

Franklin Square

On the second Sunday of the month, the Hobart Sketchers group meet at a chosen location and we sketch. Today we sketched in Franklin Square which is in the city of Hobart, about a block from the water of the Derwent River. We each sought a shady spot and drew.

I focused on the Elizabeth Street Post Office’s tower. I took this photo from where I was seated to do my drawing.

The drawing and painting that I did in 1 hour and 10 minutes. A large blob of ink unexpectedly came out on the right side of the dome, where I wanted to leave white paper, as this was where the light/sun was hitting it. I’m disappointed that I wasn’t able to capture the light on the dome.

The statue of Sir John Franklin, husband of Jane Franklin, is in the foreground. The power couple came to Tasmania in 1837, when Tasmania was called Van Diemen’s Land. They intended to bring culture and improvements to the penal colony. She established the Lady Franklin Gallery that today is again the home of the Tasmanian Art Society. The gallery has had a bumpy ride and even served as an apple storage shed for a period of time. It is a Greek style building that looks a little out of place in the Hobart suburbs. An ABC reporter asked and answered the question Why there’s a Greek-style building at the back of Lenah Valley? https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-17/history-of-lenah-valleys-greek-style-lady-franklin-gallery/9054468 tm

A front view of Sir John Franklin. I like the way the photograph has captured and frozen the water spray.
Here’s a link if you’d like to learn more about this couple’s time in Tasmania. https://www.utas.edu.au/library/companion_to_tasmanian_history/F/John%20and%20Jane%20Franklin.h

Thanks for visiting and I hope you are able to make time to draw. It is so much fun!

Battery Point, Tasmania

Well, to be more exact, Arthur Circus, located in Battery Point, Tasmania. This is where today’s urban sketch-meet took place. It was so peaceful and quiet sketching under the shady trees. Even visitors that came through with their children to use the swings, were telling them to speak quietly. It was like they were entering a library zone. It was quite surreal really.

I drew two cottages located in Arthur Circus.

my first drawing of the day – a heritage listed cottage at Arthur Circus
photo of the cottage I drew

For over 100 years, the crowded working-class cottages in Arthur Circus housed large families whose livelihoods were reliant on the waterfront.  Each cottage is now valued over $1,000,000. Battery Point is a postcode held in high esteem, close to the city, waterfront, and in such a quaint, well-kept, prestigious, historical suburb of Hobart, Tasmania. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/articles/battery-point

Arthur Circus Bsml
One of the quaint cottages surrounding the green space of Arthur Circus

Battery Point derived its name from the presence of a battery of cannons placed around the shoreline to protect the Hobart coastline. The cottages surrounded the village green of Arthur Circus, where children used to gather in the 1930s to play marbles. The cottages were built for officers of the garrison.  When they were originally built in the 1800s, they probably consisted of just two main rooms.

Arthur Cirsml
Houses are built around the green space of Arthur Circus

Arthur Circus is reportedly the only street named “Circus” in Australia.  Given the shape of the street, one would think it would have been named Arthur Circle.  But, in fact, “Circus” is an appropriate name for this special place because apparently “circus”, in Latin means “circle”, a round open space at a street junction.  Who knows, maybe a clown or two visited the grassy area to add to the festivities and fun of the birthday parties hosted there. Piccadilly Circus in London is a busy meeting place, and Arthur Circus seems to serve much the same purpose, especially with urban sketchers as many, many artists paint these cute cottages.

My second drawing of the day, #47 Arthur Circus, Battery Point.

I even drew in part of a car! Unusual for me because I avoid even attempting to draw cars.

A photo of #47 Arthur Circus. This house has a unusual roof. I don’t think I’ve ever seen another like it.

The house and car I drew from a standing position. I drew the first one while sitting on the grass.

To close off our final Hobart Urban Sketching group’s outing of 2020, we enjoyed a social throw down and coffee at Jackman & McCross, Battery Point. https://www.batterypointwalk.com.au/locations/hampden-road-shops/

We’re looking forward to another fun-filled year in and around Hobart armed with pens, pencils, paper and paint.

All the best and thanks for visiting.