Battery Point

Today, I met up with a couple of friends to do some urban sketching on Napoleon Street, Battery Point, in Tasmania.

Battery Point was originally settled in 1804. In 1811, land grants were given to free settlers and farms were established. By 1814, several farms were located in the area. In 1818, a battery of guns, called the Mulgrave Battery, were placed on the southern side of the point as part of the coastal defences on the deep water port established at Hobart Town. Battery Point derived its name from the installations of guns at this site https://www.ourtasmania.com.au/hobart/battery-pt.html

I get my art prints printed on 310gsm A-2 sized watercolour print-paper. When I trim my prints, I often have offcuts and this pile is getting quite tall. I thought I would see if it could be used for urban sketching. It worked quite well but I will have to adjust my painting technique because it is absorbent and the paper bleeds when you apply extra watery paint, as I discovered when I painted the chimney.

Trialling the print version of watercolour paper

I then felt forced to add blue sky to try to disguise the chimney-bleeding.

Blue sky colour added

The couple hours flew by and it was time to pack up the paints, move the cars from their two-hour parking limit and enjoy a hot cuppa.

The paper has potential, so I will keep experimenting with it.

Wishing everybody a great weekend.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

Urban Sketch

I felt so inspired and motivated when I left the house but once I arrived at our monthly Hobart urban sketch meet, the inspiration had exited somewhere along the way. I wandered around looking and discounting buildings: too complicated, will take too long, too exposed to the wind, too cold, no where to sit and more excuses were applied to the various sites under consideration.

I finally settled on drawing the entrance of the newly opened hotel on Murray Street, in the city. I drew it standing up with my book awkwardly balancing on my open left hand. The unsteadiness of the book contributed to looseness and wobbliness of the lines. Usually I avoid including cars, but because this one was blocking part of the view of the entrance, I felt compelled to attempt drawing it.

My approximately half an hour drawing of 12 Murray Street, Hobart, Tasmania
I drew some loose guide lines with a watercolour pencil and then drew the rest with a Fude pen.

Wishing you an inspiring week.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

House Sketch

There’s a house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania that I am drawn to (and therefore draw) lol. It’s a house that says draw-me, draw-me, so I did, again.

My latest drawing of the house:

A house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania

I decided that I really wanted the umbrella to stand out this time.

Here’s a drawing of the house I did earlier in the year.

minimalist painting (sold)

Photo of the house from where it was drawn.

The house that says “draw-me”

Is there a house or building that says “draw-me” when you see it?

Take care and wishing you happy drawing times.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

Noosa

On my first day in Noosa, Queensland, I walked the neighbourhood in search of a house to sketch. Most houses in this area are hidden behind tall fences! It took a while to find this house, which I sketched on location and partly inked (using the beautiful Fude pen Kim gifted me) before it started showering. Nothing like the threat of rain to help you develop speed-drawing! 🙂

A hard to find unfenced house in Noosa
My rendition of the un-fenced Noosa house. I focused on the lush greenery. The lighter tree at the front of the house is a frangipani.
I sat beside this very funky cactus with similar flowers to the frangipani to sketch the house across the street.
There are plenty of Pandanus Palms on the outside of fences. I like their sculptural root system.
Currawongs were knocking down and feeding on the Pandanus Palms’ fruit.
A spotted pawpaw tree
There are rainbow lorikeets in Tasmania but they seem to be plumper in Queensland.
Two of commonly sighted noisy Rainbow Lorikeets
and also often sighted; cute, small lizards

Living in these uncertain times, I treasure being able to go out, sketch and enjoy nature. I hope that the population in Ukraine, and everywhere around the world, will soon be able too.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings

Salamanca Market January 22, 2022

Wonderful blue skies, sun and heat was served up for today’s market.

It was a day for selling tote bags and pouches. Early in the morning, a couple from northern Queensland, Townsville, bought a “Salamanca Saturdays” tote bag.

Bright and colourful “Salamanca Saturdays” tote bags, made in Australia with image on both sides, available at Salamanca Market and https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags

Then a nicely bronzed young couple purchased a “Lazy Days” tote bag. She was exuberant about my wombats in hammocks paintings. They were from Melbourne, which surprised me. I thought that they would be from Queensland with their golden suntans. They explained that they have spent a week at Freycinet and a lot of time at the beach. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/national-parks-and-wilderness/freycinet-national-park-wineglass-bay

“Lazy Days” tote bag also available at either Salamanca Market or https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags

A couple with a large, black assistive dog, that was seeking shade and laying down at every opportunity, purchased “Hanging Out” tote bag. She has a wombat collection, showing me her wombat earrings that she was wearing. They live on the south coast of NSW and have many wild wombats on their property. Their dog is so used to them that he just looks at them now.

“Hanging Out” tote bag
Blackie the assistive dog

A couple spending their last day in Tassie, purchased two wombat prints: “Hanging Out” and “Bunk beds”. They live on a property north-west of Sydney that also has many wombats visit their property and dig plenty of holes/burrows.

A mother bought a “Lazy Days” tote bag for her daughter’s birthday. She’s a wombat rescue carer. A sweet brother, and first-time-uncle-to-be, bought a “Hanging Out” print for his sister, who is having a baby girl in three months. A couple bought two prints. She chose “Hanging Out” and he chose “Suspended”. He said he, “had a thing for whales, my name is Jonah”.

A family visited the stall, and the mother bought her teenage son an “Emu can Fly” print. She said her son’s nick name is “Emu”. I asked him if he likes this nick name, and he does, which was good to hear.

 

An apprehensive pillion emu – “Emus can Fly!”

I sold three original paintings today. Two urban sketches and an echidna digging up a bit of a mess.

First urban sketch sold was this one of a house in New Town. She said she couldn’t put it down, so she had to buy it. She appreciated that it is more difficult to omit areas to paint than to paint the entire picture. Omissions involves many more decisions.
The next one to sell was this urban sketch of the Elizabeth Street Post Office, Hobart, drawn and painted sitting in the middle of Franklin Square, behind the fountain and monument.
The third original painting to sell was this painting. It’s hard not to be messy when you’re an echidna and need to dig in old, rotting fallen trees to find ants for dinner

Late in the day, a mother and young son visited the stall and young Fynn chose a “What the Devil?!” pouch…. and then packing-up-time soon snuck up and that’s exactly what I did, packed up, went home, then unpacked and then finally sat down and put my feet up.

‘What the Devil!?’ pouch available at Salamanca Market and https://pjpaintings.com/collections/bags

Thank you for visiting. I wish you a great weekend and upcoming week.

House on a Hill

Once upon a time, 50 years ago, a house on a hill in Franklin, Tasmania, across from the Huon River, was built. This couple wanted a painting of their house to help celebrate 50 years of marriage and moving to Tasmania from USA the same year that they got married. They built this house (not entirely themselves), firstly living in the stone cottage, for 7 years, with the addition of two sons arriving during that time before being able to move into the larger part of the house. The stone cottage is a Quebec, Canadian design. The inside of the house and view is just as stunning.

A glimpse of the view of the Huon River from the back yard.

I finished the commissioned urban sketch of the house on a hill, on eleven acres, in Franklin, Tasmania. I drew it on site. Firstly, the front of the house and then moved to the backyard to draw the back of the house. (I haven’t finished painting the back view yet). This house is so large I had to take several photographs to get a photo of the entire width and height. It also has so many crazy angles! What a challenge!

Left hand side of the house, front view
Part of the right hand side of the house. I couldn’t get all the height and the viewing tower in the photo.

My rendition of the house. I couldn’t fit all of the front view on my page. Hence, for the back view, I have used a larger piece of paper!

My painting of the house on a hill in Franklin

Franklin is a gorgeous small town, full of heritage buildings, in southern Tasmania. https://www.franklintasmania.com.au/

Happy Anniversary to the couple living the dream in Franklin!

Cheers from PJ Paintings

A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.