Battery Point

Today, I met up with a couple of friends to do some urban sketching on Napoleon Street, Battery Point, in Tasmania.

Battery Point was originally settled in 1804. In 1811, land grants were given to free settlers and farms were established. By 1814, several farms were located in the area. In 1818, a battery of guns, called the Mulgrave Battery, were placed on the southern side of the point as part of the coastal defences on the deep water port established at Hobart Town. Battery Point derived its name from the installations of guns at this site https://www.ourtasmania.com.au/hobart/battery-pt.html

I get my art prints printed on 310gsm A-2 sized watercolour print-paper. When I trim my prints, I often have offcuts and this pile is getting quite tall. I thought I would see if it could be used for urban sketching. It worked quite well but I will have to adjust my painting technique because it is absorbent and the paper bleeds when you apply extra watery paint, as I discovered when I painted the chimney.

Trialling the print version of watercolour paper

I then felt forced to add blue sky to try to disguise the chimney-bleeding.

Blue sky colour added

The couple hours flew by and it was time to pack up the paints, move the cars from their two-hour parking limit and enjoy a hot cuppa.

The paper has potential, so I will keep experimenting with it.

Wishing everybody a great weekend.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

Noosa

On my first day in Noosa, Queensland, I walked the neighbourhood in search of a house to sketch. Most houses in this area are hidden behind tall fences! It took a while to find this house, which I sketched on location and partly inked (using the beautiful Fude pen Kim gifted me) before it started showering. Nothing like the threat of rain to help you develop speed-drawing! πŸ™‚

A hard to find unfenced house in Noosa
My rendition of the un-fenced Noosa house. I focused on the lush greenery. The lighter tree at the front of the house is a frangipani.
I sat beside this very funky cactus with similar flowers to the frangipani to sketch the house across the street.
There are plenty of Pandanus Palms on the outside of fences. I like their sculptural root system.
Currawongs were knocking down and feeding on the Pandanus Palms’ fruit.
A spotted pawpaw tree
There are rainbow lorikeets in Tasmania but they seem to be plumper in Queensland.
Two of commonly sighted noisy Rainbow Lorikeets
and also often sighted; cute, small lizards

Living in these uncertain times, I treasure being able to go out, sketch and enjoy nature. I hope that the population in Ukraine, and everywhere around the world, will soon be able too.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings

House on a Hill

Once upon a time, 50 years ago, a house on a hill in Franklin, Tasmania, across from the Huon River, was built. This couple wanted a painting of their house to help celebrate 50 years of marriage and moving to Tasmania from USA the same year that they got married. They built this house (not entirely themselves), firstly living in the stone cottage, for 7 years, with the addition of two sons arriving during that time before being able to move into the larger part of the house. The stone cottage is a Quebec, Canadian design. The inside of the house and view is just as stunning.

A glimpse of the view of the Huon River from the back yard.

I finished the commissioned urban sketch of the house on a hill, on eleven acres, in Franklin, Tasmania. I drew it on site. Firstly, the front of the house and then moved to the backyard to draw the back of the house. (I haven’t finished painting the back view yet). This house is so large I had to take several photographs to get a photo of the entire width and height. It also has so many crazy angles! What a challenge!

Left hand side of the house, front view
Part of the right hand side of the house. I couldn’t get all the height and the viewing tower in the photo.

My rendition of the house. I couldn’t fit all of the front view on my page. Hence, for the back view, I have used a larger piece of paper!

My painting of the house on a hill in Franklin

Franklin is a gorgeous small town, full of heritage buildings, in southern Tasmania. https://www.franklintasmania.com.au/

Happy Anniversary to the couple living the dream in Franklin!

Cheers from PJ Paintings

Urban Sketch-meet

We had a lively and happy sketch-meet today in the suburb of North Hobart, followed by a throw-down at the Providence Cafe. I chose to sketch this scene. The bright blue front door was a strong feature that caught my eye.

houses near Newdegate Street, North Hobart, Tasmania

My viewpoint for the sketch:

Take care and thank you for sharing my art journeying. πŸ™‚

Patricia (PJ)

Fitzroy Gardens

The Hobart Sketchers Group met at Fitzroy Gardens in South Hobart, Tasmania, today on this Day for Valentines. We had a nice group of ten gather at the beautiful and green gardens, including an urban sketcher from Launceston. kunanyi’s organ pipes were really well-marked and distinctive from this viewpoint. This mountain looks over Hobart and is a feature from many different angles depending which suburb you are viewing it from. The organ pipes could be so clearly seen from here.

our view of kunanyi

I decided to sketch a house on Fitzroy Crescent, number 43. I had a clear view of the house until a car parked in front of me.

and I really liked their street-light arrangement of the bins at the front of the house!!
The house with car parking in front of me. Ahhh, my bins are out of view now!!

Then the owner of the house wandered across the street to have a bit of a sticky beak and was so enthusiastic about what we were doing and our drawings that he moved the car, rubbish bins and even offered to make us a cup of coffee!

He saw my drawing at this stage

Then he offered to take a photo of me drawing. I think it is quite a cool shot with the house so clearly in view. He’s got a photographer’s eye!

Drawing 43 Fitzroy Crescent

I mucked up the bay windows. I didn’t draw them big enough. Next time…..

Finished sketch, with the rubbish bins!

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you make time to draw, drawing outdoors, indoors looking out or indoors looking in.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ Paintings)

Magical Corinna

I have been living in Tasmania for 25 years and have not properly explored the north west coast of the island and there are so many hidden gems! One being Corinna. All the accommodation in Corinna (it’s a popular destination!) was booked out weeks in advance, so I was only able to spend a day there. https://corinna.com.au/ It is a small, historical and isolated settlement (no wi-fi, petrol station, shops and the like) nestled along the Pieman River.

Corinna, once a thriving gold mining town, is rich with history and stories. Its ancient forests, originally housing Aboriginal hunter-gatherer society, now provides the backdrop to a largely undisturbed village as when the Europeans explored and prospected here.

After a long and bumpy drive from Arthur River, the first stop was the cafe, which is also the shop, accommodation reception, where you purchase barge ride tickets and more.

The one and only shop/cafe/reception and the like

From the window seat, I started to sketch the first cottage in view, which I later discovered was the Old Pub. I doesn’t look like what I imagine a pub would look like!

my sketch of the pub from the Corinna cafe
The Old Pub, Corinna Tasmania

Apparently it was quite a rowdy place!

After a meal, I started exploring Corinna on foot.

old petrol bowser
One of the many accommodation cottages
The Butcher Shop that is next door to the Old Pub
Another shot of the Butcher Shop. It has the coolest chimney!
The Butcher Shop. I’ve never seen a chimney like this one!
some of the characters and stories of Corinna
The Great Western. The whole time I was drawing this building, there was a pademelon chomping away. It’s difficult to see in the photo, but it is on our right side of the building, in the grass.
I drew in the pademelon at The Great Western, Corinna

We did an hour and a half walk in the beautiful Tarkine Rainforest and visited a patch where the crayfish burrow. There are boat cruises, canoeing and more adventures to be had in Corinna. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/regions-of-tasmania/west-coast/corinna

crayfish burrows

Then it was sadly time to depart, using the Fatman Barge transport novelty ($28 per car). It only fits two vehicles at a time on it, less if they are pulling a boat or trailer.

The only Stop sign in Corinna
Corinna humour
The barge coming to collect us
being transported across Pieman River. Bye-bye Corinna 😦

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you enjoyed the short tour of Corinna, Tasmania.

Cheers from Patricia Hopwood-Wade http://www.pjpaintings.com

More information about Corinna, Tasmania