Pj Paintings at Salamanca Market May 25, 2019

The mild weather provided a gentle re-introduction to Salamanca Market after being away for four weeks.
One of the first visitors to the Pj Paintings stall was a gentleman, who was wearing the same coloured jacket as me, a subdued teal green colour, which we both noted. Then we quickly discovered that there was a Canadian connection. He lives in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It’s quite unreal that his employer has sent him to Tasmania for a week to do research work about the facial tumours that Tasmanian Devils are suffering from. He purchased a “What the Devil!?” greeting card. How appropriate!
What the DevilPNGcropped
 
A Norwegian mother and daughter purchased a small original painting of two platypuses. With the focus on platypus, a man passing by with his exchange student that had just arrived in Tasmania, said that they sighted a platypus in the wild this morning, in the nearby suburb of Geilston Bay, Tasmania. They are very lucky to see that.
 
Poseidon and Amphitrite, from ancient Greek mythology, stopped by today too. They were wearing costumes made from recycled materials and plastic waste. This activity is a Salamanca Market initiative to raise awareness of the effect of waste on our oceans and environment, and to encourage creative conversations to explore the impacts of plastic in our oceans.
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Poseidon and Amphitrite.  I couldn’t help but notice that the plastic spoons, straws and other items decorating their costumes looked shiny-new and un-recycled. 
I met a young lady, who had just arrived from California, USA, who was very excited about going to see the tallest eucalyptus tree in the Florentine Valley. She purchased a small A-5 sized “Bunk beds” print. Another Californian visitor purchased a print featuring wombats, “Afternoon Siesta”, and a greeting card to send to her mother in Minnesota and mother-in-law in Tennessee.
 
An original small painting of a kangaroo will be now residing in Arizona, USA and a “Salamanca Saturdays” small print is going to be a gift for two young ladies’ grandmother.
Today’s most popular print were the wombats.
 
A thought to ponder: “Art is something that makes you breathe with a different kind of happiness.” ~ Anni Albers.
 
Wishing you a good weekend from Pj Paintings.
P.S. Prints and tote bags are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com
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Italian Poppies

The urban sketching workshop I attended (May 2019), taught by Liz Steel and organised by Mike Botton, took place in the Umbria area of Italy.  This region is green, hilly and dotted with green’s complementary colour of red.  It was so beautiful seeing wild  poppies.

We settled in the quaint, small town of Montone, where at every corner, and everywhere in between, there was a scene I yearned to paint. We visited a few towns in the region and passed poppies growing in cracks in the pavement, at the base of street signs, along the gravel sides of roads, fences, gates and in the fields. This is the view from the hotel room’s bathroom at the Hotel Fortebraccio. Do you see the fields of red poppies in this photo and in the photo above?

Montone view
view from the bathroom at the Hotel Fortebraccio

We visited the town of Assisi that is grandly presented on a green platter sprinkled with red garnish.

I painted this scene for the end-of-the-course postcard exchange.

 

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Basilica di San Francesco

I used to paint poppy fields quite often.

It was good re-visiting a topic that I haven’t painted for several years and playing with the punch-factor that complementary colours can deliver. What topic/theme is capturing your interest? I’d love to hear about it.

Thanks for visiting.

 

 

Giving it a crack in Porto

With my $10 notebook, Artline black pen, small set of watercolour paints and tiny paintbrush, I set out into Porto determined to have a crack at drawing more ridiculously challenging buildings.

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The first building I attempted to draw was the Clerigos Tower.  I sat on the cement and my bottom got too sore to continue the drawing, and I was getting lost in the detail.  For me, to be able to achieve a better end-result, I would have to draw this building several times to simplify and eliminate elements.

Clerigos Tower
One of the first baroque churches in Portugal.  Construction commenced in 1732 and was finished in 1750. 
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Photo taken from where I drew the Clerigos Tower.  The tower is 75.6 metres high and has 240 steps to reach the top, where you have a 360 degree view of the city of Porto.

Next, I drew some of this building named Conselho Regional do Porto.

Conselho Regional do Porto

Porto building
Photo of the Conselho Regional do Porto taken from where I was sitting to do the drawing.

Then I had a crack at drawing the Centro Portugues de Fotografia. A tour group decided that it would be a good meeting spot to gather right in front of me.  I had to crane my neck and then wait for them to move along as the group started to grow as more and more people arrived.

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Centro Portugues de Fotografia
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My view of the Museum of Photography

It’s day nine in Portugal and I’ve  done 19 sketches so far.  That’s the most I’ve ever done travelling.  Also, I have rarely painted outside but I have on this trip. I try to ignore the excuses that I could so easily agree with: there’s not enough time to do be able to do it justice, you’ll hardly get any of it drawn, you won’t have time to add paint, it’s going to be a bad drawing, you’ll rush and the perspective will be all wrong and more of the same.  Most of the drawings/paintings that I’ve done, I’ve had to do in a short space of time, 20-30 minutes, and because of limited time, I haven’t been able to do whole buildings, but I’m giving it a crack and as a result I’m starting to build quite a collection of drawings.

Thanks for visiting and allowing me to share some of Portugal’s awesome buildings with you.

Red, Yellow and Blue

In Sintra, not far from Lisbon, there is a magical, fairy tale-like palace, the Pena Palace.  They must have had so much fun building this outlandish, fantastical and ornate palace.  It is a must see but I strongly, strongly, strongly advise that you get there as soon as it opens.  Our tour group arrived at 9 am and we were basically able to walk straight in but on our way out, we were aghast to see the queue and there were hundreds more joining the queue for the two hour wait, in addition to another queue lower down, to buy a ticket to enter the grounds to join the two-hour queue to get into the palace.

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Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal
Penna Palace2
Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal

After visiting the Pena Palace, we stopped at Cascais before heading to Europe’s westernmost point, Cabo da Roca. At Cascais, I drew this bright red building. I had to get back on the bus before I could paint it, so it was painted at the hotel.

Cascais building
The Loja Das Meias
Cascais 1
Photo taken from where I was standing to draw the Loja Das Meias

While waiting at the Santa Apolonia Station in Lisbon, to catch a train to Coimbra, Portugal, this bright blue building caught my eye.  So I drew it and was able to partly paint the picture before I had to board the train (I can’t understand why the train didn’t want to wait for me to finish my painting??! :-/ ).

trainstationbuilding

I like the yellow colour next to the bright blue.  I’ve painted a red, yellow and blue building in Portugal.  I wonder which colour is next?!

Thanks for visiting and take care.

Early morning discovery

Went for a wander early in the morning in Dubai before the heat set in and heading to the airport and came across the Garhoud Mosque.

My sketch of the mosque.

Some more discoveries.  I thought this collection of cranes looked cool.

On the trains in Dubai, you see such a variety of dress, races and cultures. It is all so seamless, ladies dressed in full black burqas, white, black, beige or colourful hijabs, colourful saris, Arabian white robes, western clothes and nobody stops to have a second look.  It’s such a good example of acceptance and respect that countries around Dubai should aspire to.

Thanks for visiting.  I’m off to explore Lisbon, Portugal!

Giving the eye

I’ve read and generally follow the advice that when painting an animal, paint their eye first.  If you don’t get the eye right, give up and start again because no matter matter how good the rest of the painting is, the totality of the painting is going to leave you feeling disappointed.

Seahorses

I like painting the eye first for this reason but also because with the eye painted, I feel an immediate emotional connection developing with what I’m painting.  With that connection there is also the difficult to explain or describe feelings that I want to finish the painting to ‘give it life’ and welcome it to the world, even though it’s a life on a two-dimensional piece of paper. But to me it is more than just the life on a piece of paper, paintings go on to inspire, cheer, awe, provoke thoughts or consciences, ignite imaginations, memories and dreams, and more.

Seahorse

I gave this one the eye and will be bringing it to full life but not until after I return from my urban sketching holiday, which I hope you will be able to share with me via my blog posts.

Until then, take care, Pj Paintings

Who would have thought??!

My son, who lives in Canberra, asked me to paint a moth for his project. I’ve rarely painted insects.  Last year, I attempted to paint a bee and a butterfly and I think that’s about it.

Who would have thought that moths are so cute!? Or is it just me painting them cute? I never knew that they have such gorgeous little faces, a face that says, “cuddle and love me”.

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Unfinished moth
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The finished little cutie

Isn’t nature a wondrous thing?! Take care everybody and thanks for visiting.

Art Delivery

I suppose it was about four years ago when I cold canvassed Saddler’s Court Gallery in Richmond, Tasmania. I’d classify myself as a quietly confident but somewhat shy person.  I’m very comfortable with the fact that some people aren’t going to be into my art as much as others. Nevertheless, it does feel awkward showing and asking somebody that you’ve never met, if they’d be interested in selling your art.  Thankfully, the response was “yes” and ever since that day, I’ve been able to have my prints and greeting cards in a well-regarded, highly esteemed and respected gallery, alongside Tasmanian artists such as: Peter Glover, Terry Gough, David Hopkins, Dana Frey, Steve Howie, Danny Benson, Karen Armstrong, Roger Murphy and more.

Today, I delivered more prints and greeting cards to the gallery. There is stunning art on show.  It is really worth the drive.

After the art delivery, I sat across the street and tried to draw the historic building.

saddler's gallery

Saddler’s Court Gallery was opened in 1968.

All the best and thanks for stopping by.

 

 

Wearing Art

I tend to follow fashion from a distance and not spend a lot of time figuring out outfits, layers or combinations that would go well together.  Although, when I used to sew as a teenager, I would often deviate from patterns, change or add something, and create pleasing end-products.  So, there must be a flair for fashion somewhere lingering in the creative crevices of the Pj mind and soul.

Circumstances have somewhat changed my fashion flair and questionable stylishness to practicability.  The temperature on the thermometer doesn’t always reflect the intensity of the heat in Tasmania, but maybe because of the lack of ozone layer, the sun has a real bite here.  Sometimes it feels like a sauna under my dark blue-lined gazebo on market days.  Forget fashion, wearing something cool is what is of paramount importance.

Lucky me, I’ve found something cool and cool to wear.  ‘Cool’, as in – not warm, and ‘cool’, as in – hip, trendy and groovy.

wearing art
Wearing ‘Salamanca Saturdays’ at my stall at Salamanca Market

This sleeveless blouse has my ‘Salamanca Saturdays’ painting on the front.  It’s made in Australia by Redbubble, which is an online site for artists to sell their art (www.redbubble.com).  The most direct way to get to my art on the site is to type my full name in the search box (apologies in advance for its length!): Patricia Hopwood-Wade (or copy and paste my name).

I usually wear Small but this is a Medium and it fits well.  It has a little bit of a stretch and has done fine in the washing machine.  Redbubble regularly has 20% off sales, so keep your eye out for those and they are really good with exchanges, refunds and/or vouchers.

What’s your style?  Do your wear art?

During the summer months, I will be wearing my art often.

wearing art1
Another view of the stall and blouse.  Mt Wellington/kunyani is clearer in this photo

Cheers for now.

Thanks for visiting and take care, Pj

P.S. This image is also available as a print, tote bag or pouch on http://www.pjpaintings.com under the Music, Emus and Bags tabs.

 

PjPaintings at Salamanca Market December 1, 2018

Under blue skies, I drove into Salamanca Market, and where I initially parked my car, is where it stayed as the gear stick refused to go past Reverse. Several stallholders tried to get it going but with no success. At least it wasn’t blocking in any of the other stall holders. Once the market finished, RACT Roadside Assistance was able to come to my aid and with some very firm wriggling around, he got it working. What a relief! We were all too scared to use the same amount of force but I guess he’s seen this problem before.

Today, I debuted a new perspex stand to display my original paintings. The Hobart City Council offered free merchandising advice for six Salamanca market stallholders and I was one of the lucky six. I was advised to get a Perspex stand for my original paintings. I was somewhat skeptical that it would make much difference, but thankfully I was wrong! I sold seven originals from the stand.

perspex stand
The perspex stand with not too many paintings left after today’s market.  The paintings are more upright when it is fuller.

One of the original-purchaser, who bought a platypus and turtle looking at each other, had attended a baby shower where the mother-to-be was given an original painting of a sleepy wombat in a hammock that I painted. She liked it so much she came to visit my stall. I’ll have to paint more wombats, sleepy and not sleepy ones!

A couple bought an original painting of a wombat and a koala to post to her sister, who is living in the UK, for her to give to her grandchildren to help nurture the Australian connection. Another original-purchaser was from Perth, Australia and she bought four originals. She liked my sense of humour, she said.

Another visitor from Perth, Australia, who is originally from Scotland but has been living in Australia for 36 years, bought 5” x 7” ‘Salamanca Saturdays’ and ‘Salamanca Fresh’ prints.

A family from Singapore bought an A-2 sized print of ‘Poppy Fields’ and a framed ‘White Faced Scops Owls’.

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Poppy Fields

A couple from Cochrane, Alberta, a small town just outside of Calgary, are visiting their son who is working at Maydena Mountain Bike Park. They’ve been cycling around Tasmania. She said that one night, she was wearing every item of clothing she had to try to get warm in her sleeping bag. They will be spending Christmas at Maydena with their son. They bought some greeting cards, which are the easiest item to fit in when you’re travelling with a back pack.

A gentleman, who was born in Hong Kong, but is now living in Houston, USA, bought a small framed print of ‘Who, Who, Who are You? II’. Shortly after the Houston resident left the stall, a man from Texas, USA walked in. The two had almost crossed paths. He bought some greeting cards. Tomorrow, he was heading home and taking a direct flight from Melbourne to Texas, a 15.5 hour direct flight. Yikes! That’s an endurance test.

Who, Who, Who are You IIxxxsml
Who, Who, Who are You? II

 

A former neighbour of mine stopped by. She’s now living in NSW and is back in the state for her mother’s 80th birthday. It was really nice to see the all-grown-up daughter too. The mother doesn’t know that they are in the state, so she’s going to be in for a big surprise.

The clearly most popular print this weekend is: Salamanca Saturdays
A thought to ponder: “The chief enemy of creativity is ‘good’ sense.” Pablo Picasso
Thanks for stopping by,
from the Pjpaintings stall #30 at Salamanca Market.
All prints displayed are available on www.pjpaintings.com