Newest Member

I would like to introduce the newest member to the sleepy head series, this precious little fellow.

Taking it Easy

The painting is titled “Taking it Easy” and it is also available as a limited-edition print at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats.

I painted this wombat in a green-blue coloured hammock so that it would match with Spiky Bunk Beds, which is also available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats

Spiky bunk beds

I hope you enjoy the newest edition to the Sleepy head series.

Take care everybody, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Salamanca Market July 17, 2021

It was dark and 4 degrees when I exited my house. My set-up took about an hour and a half, and right on cue, my first visitor to the stall arrived, a lady from Deloraine, Tasmania. She bought “Under My Red Umbrella” and “Hayride” prints.

Under My Red Umbrella

A couple visiting from Queensland, recognised my art because her daughter follows me on Facebook and ordered a wombat tote bag online for her as she is wombat-mad. She was wearing a wombat badge, wombat earrings and a wombat top. She purchased a “Lazy Days” pouch.

Lazy Days

A couple, from Launceston on a Hobart weekend get-away, purchased a “Meet Me at the Gate” print. They already have quite a few of my prints. Most of them are hanging up in their daughter’s bedroom. They have four sons and one daughter. I think they are very deserving of their get-away break!

Meet Me at the Gate (prints are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/birds)

A couple, expecting their first child, who left Geelong, Victoria, just before the lockdown, bought “Share House” and “Sitting on the Fence” for their nursery.

“Share House” These Tawny Frogmouths are a little grumpy as they do not quite agree with this definition of ‘sharing’.

A mother and school aged son, visiting from Burnie during the last week of the two-week school holiday period, chose a print titled “Hanging Out”. Another lady, leaving Tasmania and moving to South Australia to be closer to family, also purchased a “Hanging Out” print and “Double Date IV”.

“Hanging Out”
Double Date IV

Two young ladies, extending their Tasmanian holiday because Victoria has gone into lock-down, bought a “Sitting on the Fence” print.

“Sitting on the Fence”

Honeymooners from Cairns, visiting Hobart for four days, then Freycinet and Cradle Mountain for the remainder of their time away, perused the stall. She said that her sister is having a baby and that a wombat print would look really good in a nursery.

Jodie and I rugged up at Salamanca Market. We’re next door neighbours at the market, site 30 and 31.

Jodie and I

I’ll be back at Salamanca Market in a fortnight, July 31st. All the prints in this post are available at: http://www.pjpaintings.com

Wishing everybody a safe upcoming week.

Cheers, Patricia (PJ) Hopwood-Wade

Commissions and Challenges

I’ve finished one commission and I am currently working on another. For the first commission, I was contacted by parents, who wanted an original painting to give to their daughter, at her surprise party, celebrating her graduation from medical school. They requested a sleepy wombat wearing a graduation cap, in a decorated hammock, using safety pins to attach the decorations to the hammock.

the drawing
The painting process has commenced
“Graduation Siesta” finished.

Prints of “Graduation Siesta” have been made as this would be a great gift for anybody graduating/completing any qualification, schooling and/or training. Prints are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats/products/copy-of-sleepy-head-series-bunk-beds-wombat-watercolour-1

While I was finishing off this painting, I received a request from somebody who would like to give a friend a painting of her favourite animal …. (I bet you won’t guess what her favourite animal is!!). She has recently left her job as a zookeeper and already has two prints of mine: a wombat and echidnas in hammocks. She wants to make them a feature in the nursery she is setting up, so her friend requested that I paint her favourite animal in a hammock to make it a set of three.

Suspense is over… her favourite animal is the potoroo. I’ve never drawn potoroos. I drew and erased, drew and erased, and drew and erased. I was just about to write an email to say sorry, I can’t draw these little cuties. But something happens when you keep trying and drawing, somehow you start to get to know the curves and proportions in the faces and body and it more or less came together, I think, I hope.

The drawing of potoroos
Adding paint
Adding more paint… and hopefully tomorrow I will be able to add even more paint

Potoroos are a small marsupial. They are a suborder of the kangaroo and wallaby. I’ve seen them in my back yard quite often and most recently while I was walking along the Derwent River in Bellerive, Tasmania, I saw one with its baby in the grass along the side walk. So, so cute!

If you’re looking for a challenge… well here’s one… try drawing and painting these little guy’s noses!

A challenging nose to draw
a closer look at a potoroo’s nose

Thanks for visiting and I hope that life is at a nice level of challenging for you.

Fur Day

I’m still working on my painting titled “Goldilocks and the 20 Penguins”. Hopefully I’ll soon be able to announce it finished. It will be well worthy of some celebrating as I’ve spent many, many hours on it.

Today was a fur day. This is the way my finger looks when I’m painting fur.

Wiping excess paint off on my finger so the first stroke of fur is a fine line.

I’ve painted the fur grey, blue, burnt sienna, raw sienna, burnt umber, purple and mixed some of these colours together to create a smoother graduation of colours too. Each time I rinse and put paint on my 000 size paint brush, I wipe off the paint on my finger to ensure the first stroke isn’t too thick. As a consequence of removing most of the paint, I can only do about two or three strokes before I run out of paint on my brush and have to start the process again. It is a time consuming process!

A wombat getting furrier by the hour

I think the wombat is about done, except for the foot. I have to add more shadow. They have such gnarly, gorgeous feet for all the digging they do.

https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/fauna-of-tasmania/mammals/possums-kangaroos-and-wombats/wombat

wombats have gnarly, cute, pink back feet

I’m planning to get cracking on the penguins in the next couple of days and I look forward to showing you the finished painting. In the meantime, I hope that you are finding time to relax and rest in the busy lead up to the festive season.

Wishing you a safe festive week, from Patricia (PJ)

http://www.pjpaintings.com

16 then 17

I painted the 15th and 16th penguins. Four more to go!

The newest additions – 15 and 16
…and there they are with their penguin family members, and just as surprised as the rest of them to find a wombat lounging in their sleeping quarters!!

Then I have managed to maintain the momentum and paint number 17 penguin. I’ve started drawing more of the nest too. It feels a bit like Doodle Art. That was all the rage when I was a teenager. I’d save up my money to buy the Doodle Art that came in a tube with coloured textas (felt pens). They were themed posters to colour. They are “vintage” now. I’ve coloured in THE SEA and BUTTERFLIES. They are long gone now.

Anyways, the nest reminded me of doodle art days.

can you spot number 17 penguin?

Hope you’re well and can enjoy a spell of mindless and relaxing doodling today.

Thanks for visiting,

Patricia (www.pjpaintings.com)

Missing Feet

Eight more penguins to paint

Progress is being made… I still have more penguins to paint, detail to add, not to mention the dreaded background! There are also several penguins with missing feet, including the wombat that needs his foot painted too.

Six more penguins to go!

The missing feet on this painting is not something sinister or mysterious and will soon be rectified, unlike the twenty detached human feet that have washed up on the shores around Vancouver and Vancouver Island, Canada, since 2007. The mystery around these feet, which at one time were thought to be originating from a funeral home, but investigations have since confirmed that the feet come from people who have unfortunately died. The feet detach by the normal decomposition process. The feet were usually found in sneakers. Coroners postulate that the sneakers helped to give the feet buoyancy, enough to eventually be washed ashore, and gave the feet protection from decomposition that helped them to remain relatively intact. The feet have been able to provide some closure for families by DNA matching with the National Missing Persons data base.

I’m going to make a point of enjoying my feet today! I hope that you can too.

Kind regards, from PJ Paintings

Please visit my website for a browse at: http://www.pjpaintings.com

Fairy penguins

I didn’t get much time to paint today but I did add one more fairy penguin to my picture.

Eventually all twenty will be painted. This painting that I’m working on is telling a story similar to that of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, but an Tasmanian-ised version. Here in Tasmania, there are no bears, not even koala “bears”, who aren’t bears, rather they are marsupials, so they can quite easily be discounted from this story. But there are our regular fairy penguin visitors, the smallest species of penguins.

You can imagine the surprise when twenty fairy penguins waddle up the beach to discover a wombat in their nest!! (I haven’t drawn the nest as of yet).

I’ll keep bringing more penguins to life over the next few days. Take care and thanks for stopping by, PJ Paintings