Penguin

On the coastal road between Ulverstone and Wynyard, on the north west coast of Tasmania, lies a small town named Penguin. It was first settled in 1861 as a timber town. It is named after the smallest species of penguins, the fairy penguins, that come ashore all the way along Tasmania’s north-west coast, but especially at a little beach bluff between Ulverstone and Burnie known as Penguin Point.

Penguin beach and in the far background, a retaining wall being installed to save further beach erosion from severe weather events.

As the name suggests, penguins are a frequent theme in this town. It’s nestled along the Bass Strait and has pretty beach views, walkways, beach decorations and a cemetery.

5 meter tall penguin
More penguin humour
Beach Art
beach themed decoration, a patchwork quilted bikini top
one of the many penguin themed rubbish bins on the main street

Penguin was featured on ABC’s Back Roads show. The cemetery was allotted significant focus and time on the show. It is where apparently many community social activities take place and the best view of Penguin is espoused to be from there. Therefore, I made a special effort to find it and see the view from the cemetery myself. It is spectacular, but I didn’t stay too long because I found it sad. You can’t help but read some of the tombstones that are close to the top circular driveway (the entrance & exit) that are of children who have been lost.

One of the views from the cemetery

I left the cemetery and continued with the next leg of my road trip. Penguin is a quaint and lovely place to stop, relax and enjoy. https://www.aussietowns.com.au/town/penguin-tas

My latest work in progress, titled “Goldilocks and the 20 penguins” featuring the endearing fairy penguins. Just imagine the surprise that these penguins have experienced after their evening fishing session, to come home to find a sleepy wombat in one of their nests!!

Goldilocks and the 20 penguins

I hope your upcoming week isn’t too hectic and that you are able to take the time to relax.

Painted Inktober pictures

The month of October has past and so has #Inktober2020. Most of my Inktober drawings tell a story. I have started the process of painting them. Here’s a few that have been painted.

Awwww, there’s nothing like reading a good book in the fresh air and warm sunshine… that is until the neighbourhood wombat decides to start building its home next to you and flicks up dirt onto your book!!!

This picture was drawn for the prompt word “dig” -DAY 24.

Run! A storm is coming.

This picture was drawn for the prompt word “storm” -DAY 17.

Who would have thought that people (and emus) would be buying brand new jeans that are ripped!

This picture was drawn for the prompt words “rip” and “float” -DAY 23 and 28.

Thank you for visiting and journeying with me on my unfurling art journey.

These original paintings are for sale at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/original-paintings

The Edge of the World

After staying overnight at Arthur’s River, on Tasmania’s northwest coast, and before making my way to Corinna, I was almost blown off the “Edge of the World”!!

beaches littered with logs at The Edge of the World, Tasmania

The Edge of the World is a wild and bleak place with relentless, grey-blue, angry waves, as evidenced by large amounts, and large-in-size, debris littering the beaches. It is beautiful to stand, feel and see the power and ruggedness of the ocean and its shores absorbing the constant mercilessness of it.

The view at The Edge of the Word, Gardiner Point, Tasmania

The ocean from this point to Argentina is the longest uninterrupted stretch of ocean on Earth. Inscribed on a stone plinth at the Edge is a poem written by tourism pioneer Brian Inder (Dec 1930- Aug 2019) describing the feeling of standing at this spot, being in awe of the surroundings, and reflecting that we are all little more than a speck in the spectrum of time.

Brian Inder is a well-admired in the Tasmanian northwest tourism industry, best known for founding Tasmazia & the Village of Lower Crackpot. https://www.tasmazia.com.au/ He was also pivotal in establishing Mural Fest, The Edge of the World and Mount Roland cableway.

The calmer side of the beach

This region is known as the Arthur-Pieman Conservation area. It was home to four Aboriginal clans: Peerapper, Monegin, Taskinener and Peternidic. We do not know how many people lived here before Europeans arrived. Within just 40 years, most tribal Aborigines died of European diseases while others were killed or exiled to Flinders Island.

The largest middens are in the northwest of Tasmania. Aboriginal shell middens are distinctive mounds that contain a rich history of past Aboriginal hunting, gathering and food processing activities. Discarded shells and bone, botanical remains, ash and charcoal tell the story that the Aboriginal feasted on different type of shellfish and seabirds. The women gathered shellfish and food plants, dived for abalone, lobster and were experts at hunting seals. They dug themselves hiding spots in the cobble beaches, where they hid and waited until they saw the opportunity to pounce on an unsuspecting seal and clubbed it to death. In the early 1800s, some European sealers and whalers took Aboriginal women to help them catch seals. Some of today’s Tasmanian Aborigines have descended from these women’s relations with the sealers and whalers.

At the viewing platform there are informative information plaques

There were many little birds darting around in the bushes along the path back to the car park.

A male Superb fairy-wren
Resting place for displaced logs at the Edge of the World, Tasmania

Thank you for visiting.

Trowutta What?!

This is the response you get from most people when you mention Trowutta Arch, even to Tasmanians who have lived on the north-west coast all their lives. It is mysteriously overlooked despite being a geological wonder.

The Trowutta Arch is a rare naturally occurring arch that was created by the collapse of a cave resulting in two sinkholes either side of the arch formation. One sinkhole filled in with soil and was eventually covered by trees and ferns, while the other filled with water.

Trowutta Arch

The water is a bright green, almost fluorescent. The colours and atmosphere make it feel quite surreal. The water-filled sinkhole is geomorphologically classified as a cenote – a steep walled water-filled sinkhole. The Trowutta Arch is considered one of the world’s best examples of a cenote. It is more than 20 metres deep and is an important habitat for invertebrates.

water filled sink hole – Trowutta Arch

Trowutta Arch is about 25 kilometres inland from Smithton in Tasmania’s far north west.  It’s a short, easy walk through spectacular rain forest to get to the arch. Along the way to the arch, I found the mirror image of the ferns’ dead and live fronds, visually very cool.

hour glass ferns

I love fern fronds. A few years ago, I went for a walk and took photos of lots of fronds. When I got home, I discovered that I took over 50 photos of fronds! I tried to use some restraint this time.

unfurling fronds

If you are visiting the north-west of Tasmania, it is well worth seeking out this gem.

a fern frond with the path to the arch in the background

Thanks for stopping by and I hope that the upcoming week serves you up many joyful moments.

Magical Corinna

I have been living in Tasmania for 25 years and have not properly explored the north west coast of the island and there are so many hidden gems! One being Corinna. All the accommodation in Corinna (it’s a popular destination!) was booked out weeks in advance, so I was only able to spend a day there. https://corinna.com.au/ It is a small, historical and isolated settlement (no wi-fi, petrol station, shops and the like) nestled along the Pieman River.

Corinna, once a thriving gold mining town, is rich with history and stories. Its ancient forests, originally housing Aboriginal hunter-gatherer society, now provides the backdrop to a largely undisturbed village as when the Europeans explored and prospected here.

After a long and bumpy drive from Arthur River, the first stop was the cafe, which is also the shop, accommodation reception, where you purchase barge ride tickets and more.

The one and only shop/cafe/reception and the like

From the window seat, I started to sketch the first cottage in view, which I later discovered was the Old Pub. I doesn’t look like what I imagine a pub would look like!

my sketch of the pub from the Corinna cafe
The Old Pub, Corinna Tasmania

Apparently it was quite a rowdy place!

After a meal, I started exploring Corinna on foot.

old petrol bowser
One of the many accommodation cottages
The Butcher Shop that is next door to the Old Pub
Another shot of the Butcher Shop. It has the coolest chimney!
The Butcher Shop. I’ve never seen a chimney like this one!
some of the characters and stories of Corinna
The Great Western. The whole time I was drawing this building, there was a pademelon chomping away. It’s difficult to see in the photo, but it is on our right side of the building, in the grass.
I drew in the pademelon at The Great Western, Corinna

We did an hour and a half walk in the beautiful Tarkine Rainforest and visited a patch where the crayfish burrow. There are boat cruises, canoeing and more adventures to be had in Corinna. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/regions-of-tasmania/west-coast/corinna

crayfish burrows

Then it was sadly time to depart, using the Fatman Barge transport novelty ($28 per car). It only fits two vehicles at a time on it, less if they are pulling a boat or trailer.

The only Stop sign in Corinna
Corinna humour
The barge coming to collect us
being transported across Pieman River. Bye-bye Corinna 😦

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you enjoyed the short tour of Corinna, Tasmania.

Cheers from Patricia Hopwood-Wade http://www.pjpaintings.com

More information about Corinna, Tasmania

The Famous Wineglass Bay

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania, rates highly as one of the top beaches in the world. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/wineglass-bay

My girlfriend, who is soon moving to New Zealand, and I are doing a road trip in Tasmania, one last look for her before she leaves. Wineglass Bay was our first stop. On the way, we saw a sweet little echidna on the side of the road. They are quite common in Tasmania, but I certainly don’t see them very often. https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/echidna

It’s quite a steep trek to the Wineglass viewing platform. I love the boulders, their shape, strength and colour.

passing by boulders on way to the viewing platform
A quick sketch of the boulders

Scenes from the viewing platform.

Wineglass Bay with Hazards Beach on the other side
My quick sketch of the view

On our walk back to the car park, going the Hazards Beach way, my friend suddenly stopped and screamed. It’s strange how childhood experiences embed in brains so deeply. I immediately thought there must be a bear ahead on the track, but at the same time my brain told me that there are no bears in Australia (I have encountered bears several times in Canada while bush walking) and then I saw a snake slither into the bush. I had to push my friend past as she is petrified of snakes.

We saw many fairy wrens in the bush, which inspired this inktober drawing (it’ll look nicer when I add paint :-). What does Wineglass Bay and Superb fairy-wrens have in common….?

a fairy wren being a good dad

…… they have both been voted #1 and they are both a brilliant turquoise. https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/08/six-things-you-didnt-know-about-superb-fairy-wrens/

After walking for four hours, we were grateful to be sitting down! We had a counter meal in Coles Bay where I met a fellow Belgian, Annabelle.

Two Belgians in Coles Bay, Tasmania

Thanks for visiting.

Cheers from PJ Paintings

An #Inktober Flurry

The prompt word for day 13 is “dune”. I drew some emus having a gleeful time driving a dune buggy. There’s not a sign of apprehension on their faces, despite steering with their feet due having wingless bodies. They know how to ignore potential limitations and experience adventures.

Adventuring emus

Day 14’s prompt word is “armor”. I drew a male fairy wren sitting on an abandoned helmet. The Superb fairy-wren was voted Australia’s favourite bird, which is no surprise being such a lovely shaped, little bird with a bright turquoise crown. https://birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/superb-fairy-wren

a watchful dad

I combined day 15 and 16’s prompt words: “outpost” and “rocket”.

An outpost house sad to see its only resident go

Day 17 and the prompt word is “storm”. This emu is hurrying to get inside before she gets caught in a storm.

Avoiding the oncoming storm

I’m all caught up. Hooray!

Thanks for stopping by. Take care, from Pj Paintings http://www.pjpaintings.com

Sketch-meet

On the second Sunday of each month, a small group of Hobartians, set up on footpaths of streets, parks, or the like, to do some urban sketching. This Sunday we sketched on New Town Rd with easy view of the old post office stores, Jackman & McRoss Bakery and Dispatch Cafe.

The old post office stores with Dispatch Cafe next to it
Post Office Stores – I drew firstly with a grey texta to try to help me not get too caught up in the detail.

There was about 10 minutes before we were to meet at Dispatch Cafe, so I used my grey texta and applied watercolour to do a very quick drawing of Jackman & McRoss Bakery.

An almost direct watercolour drawing
My view of the Cafe

We met at the Dispatch Cafe for a lively cuppa and throw down.

Mosaic in Dispatch Cafe

I took photos of the awesome mosaic in the washroom at Dispatch.

Three dimensional mosaic
Three dimensional mosaic made by Tanya La Paglia displayed at the Dispatch Cafe, which used to be the old post office which was officially opened on January 1, 1842.

I hope that you have a good week and keep the pen/s drawing.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings http://www.pjpaintings.com

A Mixture

The #inktober is marching on and it’s getting a little difficult to keep up with it… but I’m persevering. I think I will temporarily fall behind a little because my drawing for tomorrow’s word is quite complicated. But for yesterday’s and today’s prompt word, simplicity prevails and I’m relying on the application of watercolour paints to bring life and depth to the drawings. So, without further delay, Day 11 of the #Inktober2020 Challenge is “disgusting”.

Disgusting!

I think that everybody would agree that stepping into fresh dog poo is rather disgusting. But what is more disgusting is missing the key to true, world-wide peace and human rights. Unfortunately treating every human life with value and respect, remains a theory with everything from genocide to bullying, and in between, still occurring. It is heart breaking and disgusting. Our challenge every day, actions upholding, or not upholding, the values espoused by the Human Rights Declaration? https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

Key to human rights – valuing each individual

The prompt word for Day 12 is “slippery”.

Slippery

It is a slippery and tricky exercise riding a whale!

I hope the start of your week is going well!

Cheers, from PJ Paintings http://www.pjpaintings.com