A walk in Buderim Forest Park

I found some hidden gems in the Buderim Forest Park, near Sunshine Coast, Queensland.

Firstly, there was the waterfall.

The vegetation was cool. I came across camouflaged trees.

Trees dressed in military camouflage
Palms’ colourful roots bursting out from the base of trees

Brightly coloured fungus …

…. and some red mushrooms

A quick painting of the beauties I saw today.

I love seeing wild mushrooms/fungi but my love for fungi doesn’t run as deep as “Fungi Girl”.

“Fungi Girl” original painting available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/original-paintings

Meet you in another park, in the meantime, take care.

PJ Paintings

Mooloolaba

The Queensland slogan “beautiful one day, perfect the next” did not hold true when we visited Mooloolaba, a coastal suburb of Maroochydore in the Sunshine Coast Region, Queensland, Australia. We found ourselves some protection from the wind and rain at the Mooloolaba Wharf.

My view from one of the undercover sections of the wharf
sketched with rain blowing in the wind

Mooloolaba derives from the Aboriginal word mulu, meaning snapper fish, or mulla meaning Red-bellied Black Snake. I would have liked to have had a photo with this friendly Mooloolaba character but the wet bench and blustery weather wasn’t enticing enough.

I hope that your day is going along nicely.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

Hastings Street, Noosa

Hastings Street, Noosa, in Queensland, is lined with shops, cafes, restaurants and galleries, with trees wrapped in fairy lights in the centre boulevards. This tree dwarfed the shops behind it. The leafy cover is wider than it is tall.

Hastings Street in Noosa.

This tree came complete with some Australian Brushturkeys scratching and foraging around its base.

One of the many Australian Brushturkeys making themselves at home on the streets of Noosa. We saw a young one too. A little cutie.

I hope that your day is going well where you are.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

An Australian Brushturkey foraging on Hastings Street, Noosa.

Noosa

On my first day in Noosa, Queensland, I walked the neighbourhood in search of a house to sketch. Most houses in this area are hidden behind tall fences! It took a while to find this house, which I sketched on location and partly inked (using the beautiful Fude pen Kim gifted me) before it started showering. Nothing like the threat of rain to help you develop speed-drawing! 🙂

A hard to find unfenced house in Noosa
My rendition of the un-fenced Noosa house. I focused on the lush greenery. The lighter tree at the front of the house is a frangipani.
I sat beside this very funky cactus with similar flowers to the frangipani to sketch the house across the street.
There are plenty of Pandanus Palms on the outside of fences. I like their sculptural root system.
Currawongs were knocking down and feeding on the Pandanus Palms’ fruit.
A spotted pawpaw tree
There are rainbow lorikeets in Tasmania but they seem to be plumper in Queensland.
Two of commonly sighted noisy Rainbow Lorikeets
and also often sighted; cute, small lizards

Living in these uncertain times, I treasure being able to go out, sketch and enjoy nature. I hope that the population in Ukraine, and everywhere around the world, will soon be able too.

Thanks for visiting, Pj Paintings

Government House Urban Sketching Day

We were lucky enough to have an urban sketching meet-up on the grounds of the Government House in Hobart, Tasmania, thanks to Dennis Pang for organising.

https://www.govhouse.tas.gov.au/gallery/history

My usual approach to tackling a building when I’m drawing on location is to start with some loose guidelines using a coloured watercolour pencil and then adding ink. Usually I add the watercolour paint at home.

a section at the back of Government House
photo of the section I attempted to draw on the day

When I attempted to draw this front part of the Government House, I flipped my approach and went with paint first. It looked terrible but it is surprising how much it improves when you add ink. I worked into the picture at home with an Artline pen.

Government House tower

It was a lovely and fun day. I hope I have the opportunity to draw on the grounds of the Government House again.

Thanks for visiting and take care

Lenah Valley Urban Sketch

This morning’s 25 minute plein-air drawing of a house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania https://www.ourtasmania.com.au/hobart/lenah-valley.html.

Quick sketch done from the footpath across the street

I added minimal paint when I got home. I remembered to try to use purple in my shadow colour. I really liked using a purple-grey colour for shadows! 🙂 Hopefully I will always remember to do so.

Minimalist approach to Lenah Valley house

I hope the upcoming week is a good one for all.

Cheers, from Patricia

House on a Hill

Once upon a time, 50 years ago, a house on a hill in Franklin, Tasmania, across from the Huon River, was built. This couple wanted a painting of their house to help celebrate 50 years of marriage and moving to Tasmania from USA the same year that they got married. They built this house (not entirely themselves), firstly living in the stone cottage, for 7 years, with the addition of two sons arriving during that time before being able to move into the larger part of the house. The stone cottage is a Quebec, Canadian design. The inside of the house and view is just as stunning.

A glimpse of the view of the Huon River from the back yard.

I finished the commissioned urban sketch of the house on a hill, on eleven acres, in Franklin, Tasmania. I drew it on site. Firstly, the front of the house and then moved to the backyard to draw the back of the house. (I haven’t finished painting the back view yet). This house is so large I had to take several photographs to get a photo of the entire width and height. It also has so many crazy angles! What a challenge!

Left hand side of the house, front view
Part of the right hand side of the house. I couldn’t get all the height and the viewing tower in the photo.

My rendition of the house. I couldn’t fit all of the front view on my page. Hence, for the back view, I have used a larger piece of paper!

My painting of the house on a hill in Franklin

Franklin is a gorgeous small town, full of heritage buildings, in southern Tasmania. https://www.franklintasmania.com.au/

Happy Anniversary to the couple living the dream in Franklin!

Cheers from PJ Paintings

A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.