A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.

Urban Sketch-meet

We had a lively and happy sketch-meet today in the suburb of North Hobart, followed by a throw-down at the Providence Cafe. I chose to sketch this scene. The bright blue front door was a strong feature that caught my eye.

houses near Newdegate Street, North Hobart, Tasmania

My viewpoint for the sketch:

Take care and thank you for sharing my art journeying. 🙂

Patricia (PJ)

Lindisfarne Bay, Tasmania

Hobart’s urban sketching group met today at Lindisfarne Bay. Despite it being on the chilly side today, and that there was the sporadic burst of wind, we had an enjoyable and productive time.

I have always wanted to sketch the Tasman Bridge, which is a significant land mark of Hobart, especially with the history attached to it, the tragedy of a boat running into it and the loss of lives as a consequence of it being broken. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-05/memory-of-tasman-bridge-collapse-lingers/10684234

This is the view I decided that I would attempt to draw. Note the Cormorant standing on the rock near the shore and the pelican in the middle-ground approaching.

view from Lindisfarne Bay on the Eastern Shore of Hobart
Here’s my plein air sketch of the scene

There was some drama on the water while sketching. A pelican made a b-line for a Cormorant standing on a rock, minding its own business. It had to make a quick exit along with the seagulls! I thought the pelican was going to try to eat it!

An annoyed pelican that the birds on the rock didn’t stay put
I wanted to eat you Mr Cormorant!

There was a very friendly magpie on the scene too.

an exceptionally friendly magpie

I hope everybody has also had an enjoyable Sunday and that the upcoming week goes well for all.

Cheers, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

100 People Challenge

The drawing 100 people in five days challenge has come and gone. I have come close to drawing 100 people in the past but have never quite got over the line. Last year, I didn’t even attempt it and the same almost happened this year. But I attended the Summer Salt Music Festival, in Hobart, Tasmania’s Botanical Gardens https://summersaltmusic.com.au/past-events/hobart/ on Friday, March 12th that coincided with the 100 people challenge. So, while standing in line, I pushed myself to start drawing people. I drew 22 people and then it just got too dark to see. Also, once seated, there were mainly backs of heads to draw, which didn’t inspire me very much.

I won’t bore you with all 22 drawings because frankly most of them are pretty ordinary. I’ve chosen what I think are the best of the lot.

This gothic young woman was sitting fairly close to us. I found her a great person to sketch with her thick, dark long eyelashes, nose ring, lip stud, lacy black top, black skirt and black hat.

At the music festival with the very strict COVID no dancing rule being enforced

I drew her again when she was holding onto her bare foot. Her friend beside her was eating slices of salami,

At the Summer Salt Festival, Hobart, Tasmania
Enjoying the music

The live music was awesome as I hope the start of your week has been.

Many thanks for stopping by and visiting.

Cheers, Patricia (www.pjpaintings.com)

Urban sketching in North Hobart

For today’s urban sketch meet we met at a funky little cafe in North Hobart called Pigeon Hole Cafe. Our small group of eight sketchers dispersed and drew a variety of buildings and houses. The hills and slopes added an extra level of perspective-challenge.

A church built into the slope across the street from the cafe where we met

I chose to undertake this challenge on Goulburn Street. I liked that I could see a little of kunanyi/Mt Wellington just peeking over the roof of the building.

building built in 1924 on Goulburn Street, North Hobart, Tasmania

This is what I drew and started painting outside before I decided it was time to seek warmth and a well deserved cup of coffee.

plein air

…. and the finished wonky attempt.

a Goulburn Street building

I hope that everybody has had a lovely weekend and wish you an equally lovely upcoming week.

Thanks for dropping in for a read. Cheers, Patricia (PJ)

Fitzroy Gardens

The Hobart Sketchers Group met at Fitzroy Gardens in South Hobart, Tasmania, today on this Day for Valentines. We had a nice group of ten gather at the beautiful and green gardens, including an urban sketcher from Launceston. kunanyi’s organ pipes were really well-marked and distinctive from this viewpoint. This mountain looks over Hobart and is a feature from many different angles depending which suburb you are viewing it from. The organ pipes could be so clearly seen from here.

our view of kunanyi

I decided to sketch a house on Fitzroy Crescent, number 43. I had a clear view of the house until a car parked in front of me.

and I really liked their street-light arrangement of the bins at the front of the house!!
The house with car parking in front of me. Ahhh, my bins are out of view now!!

Then the owner of the house wandered across the street to have a bit of a sticky beak and was so enthusiastic about what we were doing and our drawings that he moved the car, rubbish bins and even offered to make us a cup of coffee!

He saw my drawing at this stage

Then he offered to take a photo of me drawing. I think it is quite a cool shot with the house so clearly in view. He’s got a photographer’s eye!

Drawing 43 Fitzroy Crescent

I mucked up the bay windows. I didn’t draw them big enough. Next time…..

Finished sketch, with the rubbish bins!

Thanks for visiting and I hope that you make time to draw, drawing outdoors, indoors looking out or indoors looking in.

Take care, from Patricia (PJ Paintings)

Opossum Bay

I love Opossum Bay, located in southern Tasmania. I feel like I’ve travelled to another part of the world but it’s only about a 25 minute drive from my house, and the drive is picturesque too.

I love the shape of the bay and I love what this resident has made from random, lost thongs found on the beach! What an awesome and creative idea.
a photo from the other direction

The stand-out house for me at Opossum Bay is this quirky lighthouse house. Through the darkened lower windows you can catch glimpse of a large wooden boat with a mermaid-like figurehead. It looks impressive from a distance so I can only imagine how much more so close up.

my favourite house along the beach

I was keen to try to draw the lighthouse house. I struggled with the perspective but it was still fun to try.

My sketch

There were a variety of seagulls enjoying the bay too.

Thanks for visiting and stay safe.

Franklin Square

On the second Sunday of the month, the Hobart Sketchers group meet at a chosen location and we sketch. Today we sketched in Franklin Square which is in the city of Hobart, about a block from the water of the Derwent River. We each sought a shady spot and drew.

I focused on the Elizabeth Street Post Office’s tower. I took this photo from where I was seated to do my drawing.

The drawing and painting that I did in 1 hour and 10 minutes. A large blob of ink unexpectedly came out on the right side of the dome, where I wanted to leave white paper, as this was where the light/sun was hitting it. I’m disappointed that I wasn’t able to capture the light on the dome.

The statue of Sir John Franklin, husband of Jane Franklin, is in the foreground. The power couple came to Tasmania in 1837, when Tasmania was called Van Diemen’s Land. They intended to bring culture and improvements to the penal colony. She established the Lady Franklin Gallery that today is again the home of the Tasmanian Art Society. The gallery has had a bumpy ride and even served as an apple storage shed for a period of time. It is a Greek style building that looks a little out of place in the Hobart suburbs. An ABC reporter asked and answered the question Why there’s a Greek-style building at the back of Lenah Valley? https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-17/history-of-lenah-valleys-greek-style-lady-franklin-gallery/9054468 tm

A front view of Sir John Franklin. I like the way the photograph has captured and frozen the water spray.
Here’s a link if you’d like to learn more about this couple’s time in Tasmania. https://www.utas.edu.au/library/companion_to_tasmanian_history/F/John%20and%20Jane%20Franklin.h

Thanks for visiting and I hope you are able to make time to draw. It is so much fun!

Battery Point, Tasmania

Well, to be more exact, Arthur Circus, located in Battery Point, Tasmania. This is where today’s urban sketch-meet took place. It was so peaceful and quiet sketching under the shady trees. Even visitors that came through with their children to use the swings, were telling them to speak quietly. It was like they were entering a library zone. It was quite surreal really.

I drew two cottages located in Arthur Circus.

my first drawing of the day – a heritage listed cottage at Arthur Circus
photo of the cottage I drew

For over 100 years, the crowded working-class cottages in Arthur Circus housed large families whose livelihoods were reliant on the waterfront.  Each cottage is now valued over $1,000,000. Battery Point is a postcode held in high esteem, close to the city, waterfront, and in such a quaint, well-kept, prestigious, historical suburb of Hobart, Tasmania. https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/articles/battery-point

Arthur Circus Bsml
One of the quaint cottages surrounding the green space of Arthur Circus

Battery Point derived its name from the presence of a battery of cannons placed around the shoreline to protect the Hobart coastline. The cottages surrounded the village green of Arthur Circus, where children used to gather in the 1930s to play marbles. The cottages were built for officers of the garrison.  When they were originally built in the 1800s, they probably consisted of just two main rooms.

Arthur Cirsml
Houses are built around the green space of Arthur Circus

Arthur Circus is reportedly the only street named “Circus” in Australia.  Given the shape of the street, one would think it would have been named Arthur Circle.  But, in fact, “Circus” is an appropriate name for this special place because apparently “circus”, in Latin means “circle”, a round open space at a street junction.  Who knows, maybe a clown or two visited the grassy area to add to the festivities and fun of the birthday parties hosted there. Piccadilly Circus in London is a busy meeting place, and Arthur Circus seems to serve much the same purpose, especially with urban sketchers as many, many artists paint these cute cottages.

My second drawing of the day, #47 Arthur Circus, Battery Point.

I even drew in part of a car! Unusual for me because I avoid even attempting to draw cars.

A photo of #47 Arthur Circus. This house has a unusual roof. I don’t think I’ve ever seen another like it.

The house and car I drew from a standing position. I drew the first one while sitting on the grass.

To close off our final Hobart Urban Sketching group’s outing of 2020, we enjoyed a social throw down and coffee at Jackman & McCross, Battery Point. https://www.batterypointwalk.com.au/locations/hampden-road-shops/

We’re looking forward to another fun-filled year in and around Hobart armed with pens, pencils, paper and paint.

All the best and thanks for visiting.