Scurry

Day 2 of the Inktober Challenge. The prompt word for today is “scurry”. I associate this word with squirrels, so that’s what I drew. I’ve drawn my squirrels with an Artline pen.

Squirrels

I hope you’re having a great weekend.

Cheers for now, from Patricia (PJ)

Melbourne Visit

We’re off to Melbourne.

Drawn from the Hobart, Tasmania terminal, while waiting for our plane.

After arriving on Friday, we wandered around and settled for a bite to eat in one of the laneways in the city. This was our view from our eating spot.

View from our eating spot in Meyers Lane, Melbourne
initial drawing, Meyers Lane
Meyers Lane’s view

The next day started by a visit to the South Melbourne Market and then exploring St Kilda, including this cool community garden.

cool sculptures in various gardeners’ patches
I love worms too 🙂
I love buttons for art and decorating. 🙂

The visit to St. Kilda ended with sketching a duplex that caught my eye on Park Street. I love the roofline decorative tiles so many of the older houses have in this area. On Park Street itself, there were quite a few raised garden beds in front of houses.

initial sketch
sketch with paint, Park Street, St. Kilda

Sunday morning, we viewed the amazing Picasso exhibition https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/the-picasso-century/

One of the first exhibition picture on display is Picasso’s second-ever etching titled “Le Repas Frugal”, 1904.

Two of Picasso’s paintings of his first wife, Olga Khokhlova. Despite the Spanish flavour of the 1917 painting, Olga is from Russia, a ballet dancer, with Ukrainian origins. I find it interesting that she is depicted with quite big hands and feet in the first painting. From 1919 to 1929, Olga received over 500 letters from her mother and sister, whom she didn’t see.

“The Reader” 1920 oil on canvas
Olga in Armchair by Pablo Picasso, 1917
“Portrait of a woman” by Pablo Picasso, 1938, oil on canvas Maar and Picasso became lovers and intellectual confidants. Maar was the inspiration for many portraits, including this 1938 canvas
Picasso’s “The Kiss”
1921 oil on canvas
“Weeping woman” oil on canvas by Pablo Picasso, 1937
Pablo Picasso 1881-1973
“Massacre in Korea”
1951 oil on plywood
Picasso painted this work in reaction to the Korean War. Nothing in this painting specifically ties to Korea, not the landscape or people. Picasso said that when he thinks of war he does not think of a particular trait, only that of monstrosity. I agree and think this should be applied to all wars, including the current war being waged on Ukraine.
“The Bay of Cannes” 1958 oil on canvas

These are only a fraction of the paintings on display. After the exhibition, we found a spot to sketch the renowned Flinders Station. I was settling nicely into the zone, then the rain disturbed my happy space.

My weekend in Melbourne finished with the fairy tale magic of Cinderella.

Trust that your week is is travelling along magically.

cheers, Patricia

Urban Sketch

I felt so inspired and motivated when I left the house but once I arrived at our monthly Hobart urban sketch meet, the inspiration had exited somewhere along the way. I wandered around looking and discounting buildings: too complicated, will take too long, too exposed to the wind, too cold, no where to sit and more excuses were applied to the various sites under consideration.

I finally settled on drawing the entrance of the newly opened hotel on Murray Street, in the city. I drew it standing up with my book awkwardly balancing on my open left hand. The unsteadiness of the book contributed to looseness and wobbliness of the lines. Usually I avoid including cars, but because this one was blocking part of the view of the entrance, I felt compelled to attempt drawing it.

My approximately half an hour drawing of 12 Murray Street, Hobart, Tasmania
I drew some loose guide lines with a watercolour pencil and then drew the rest with a Fude pen.

Wishing you an inspiring week.

Cheers, from Patricia (PJ)

House Sketch

There’s a house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania that I am drawn to (and therefore draw) lol. It’s a house that says draw-me, draw-me, so I did, again.

My latest drawing of the house:

A house in Lenah Valley, Tasmania

I decided that I really wanted the umbrella to stand out this time.

Here’s a drawing of the house I did earlier in the year.

minimalist painting (sold)

Photo of the house from where it was drawn.

The house that says “draw-me”

Is there a house or building that says “draw-me” when you see it?

Take care and wishing you happy drawing times.

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

Government House Urban Sketching Day

We were lucky enough to have an urban sketching meet-up on the grounds of the Government House in Hobart, Tasmania, thanks to Dennis Pang for organising.

https://www.govhouse.tas.gov.au/gallery/history

My usual approach to tackling a building when I’m drawing on location is to start with some loose guidelines using a coloured watercolour pencil and then adding ink. Usually I add the watercolour paint at home.

a section at the back of Government House
photo of the section I attempted to draw on the day

When I attempted to draw this front part of the Government House, I flipped my approach and went with paint first. It looked terrible but it is surprising how much it improves when you add ink. I worked into the picture at home with an Artline pen.

Government House tower

It was a lovely and fun day. I hope I have the opportunity to draw on the grounds of the Government House again.

Thanks for visiting and take care

Salamanca Market November 6, 2021

Rain was forecasted but that didn’t happen until late in the day and the amount was hardly worth mentioning. Salamanca Market enjoyed blue skies and possibly this was the reason for the sudden significant increase of stall holders. It looked like pre-COVID again, but the numbers allowed into the market is still restricted, therefore, less people visiting each stall.

I had a couple, with their friend from Adelaide, who was finally able to visit them. She was carrying her Salamanca Saturday tote bag that her friends had bought and posted to her. She bought four Christmas greeting cards.

A visitor from Burnie, Tasmania, bought “Fairy wrens”, “Lazy Days” and “Spiky bunk beds” prints and the “Salamanca Saturdays” and “Salamanca Fresh” cushion covers. I took my resource photo of the Salamanca Market scene from the opposite end of the market that my stall site is at (site 30) because I wanted to paint the historic sandstone buildings and kunanyi/Mt. Wellington. I took the photo when there were up to 353 stalls on a Saturday. https://www.salamancamarket.com.au/Home

Salamanca Fresh – excited emus going to Salamanca Market passing in front of Salamanca Fresh shop housed in this beautiful building

A father and daughter stopped in. He bought “Poppy Fields for his wife and she bought “Yellow Poppy Fields” and “Hanging Out” prints.

Seven-year-old Lucy, from Adelaide, bought an “All Ears” greeting card (heavily discounted) with her own money to give to her friend for her birthday. The birthday party was taking place while she was having her Tasmanian holiday. Her mother bought her two prints. She really wanted three, but they managed to settle on two.

Two young ladies, also from Adelaide, purchased “Tu-whit & Tu-whoo” and “Bonnie & Me!” prints. They were flying home tonight but had one last Tassie adventure planned. They were to do a 90-minute scenic sea plane flight at 2pm! They were a little nervous about air sickness. I hope it all went well and they enjoyed the views from above.

A lady, from Brisbane, bought an original painting that I painted of a cottage by the Providence Café https://www.liveatprovidence.com.au/ She said that her father, along with his parents, brothers and grandmother lived in a cottage on Bradley Street, Brisbane, that looked very similar to the one I had painted.

cottage near the Providence Cafe in North Hobart, Tasmania

Take care and I hope that your week is going well,

Cheers, from PJ Paintings

http://www.pjpaintings.com

A wonky Weaver’s Cottage

My sketch of the quaint and historic Weaver’s Cottage in Oatlands, where wool is spun and being woven into fabulous and beautiful products right beside the front door, as you enter into the shop.

The actual shop isn’t wonky but my drawing sure is! But to quote Liz Steel, “embrace the wonkiness”.

The Weaver’s Cottages Studio in Oatlands, now stocking PJ Paintings greeting cards and A-5 sized prints

Oatlands is a picturesque, buzzing little town off the Midlands Highway, Tasmania. A brand new, large and fabulous gallery has just opened on the main street too!

I hope you can stop in soon and have a wander.

Take care, from Patricia Hopwood-Wade

Oatlands, Tasmania

I thoroughly enjoyed my day in Oatlands, Tasmania, about an hour’s drive from Hobart. The town is packed with gorgeous scenes, surprises, and history. The Georgian architecture, sculptures, rock walls and gardens are such a treat for the eyes.

I love rock walls! and there are so many in Oatlands
Another gorgeous rock wall with an eagle taking a strong stance pose

Along High Street (the main street through Oatlands) there are gorgeous houses and gardens.

there are so many beautiful stone walls and gorgeous gardens

We stopped into Vintage on High Café https://www.instagram.com/vintageonhigh/?hl=en, where I enjoyed a cuppa and sketched the shop across the street, which unfortunately was closed on Mondays.

Vintage Cafe on High Street
The narrow space between the cafe and the next building. I like the iron lace.
my sketch of the closed Elm Cottage Store on High Street, Oatlands

The cafe has a wonderful outside seating area, including an abundance of fruit trees and this cool stork sculpture.

stork sculpture among the fruit trees

Further down High Street, there’s another stork sculpture!

I love this sculpture!

The Oatlands Court House was built in 1829. Many death sentences were handed out here however, all but eighteen were later commuted to life sentences. The eighteen men were executed in the nearby jail. One poor soul was innocent of the murder he was convicted of, but it was too late for him. The real murderer confessed of his ill-deed on his death bed. Solomon Blay, who resided in Oatlands, was the executioner for Oatlands, Launceston and Hobart.

The Court House

We visited the remnants of the heritage listed jail in Oatlands. Oatlands was established as a military garrison in 1827 and was the primary military outpost in inland Tasmania. Over the next decade, close to 90 buildings were constructed in the town using convict labour, including the court house, soldiers’ barracks, watch house, and officers’ quarters. Today, the town has one of the largest collections of intact Georgian architecture in Australia.

The goal

Completed in 1835, the Oatlands Gaol was designed to hold over 200 prisoners but was never fully occupied. Used as a military gaol and municipal prison until 1936, the complex was closed and largely demolished in 1937. The gaol’s main use since the 1950s has been as the site of Oatlands’ municipal swimming pool. https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-gaol/

Another view of the gaol
The worn steps at the side entrance of the goal

You can pick up a key from the Oatlands council building that gives you access to three buildings, the gaol, courthouse and the commissariat https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/oatlands-commissariat/ The council had had some reports about problems with the electronic key and I could confirm that there are problems. Only one out of the three keys worked.

3 and 5 Albert Street Cottages in Oatlands

The block of land that these cottages stand on was granted to John Goulder, a freed convict in 1839. Goulder settled here in 1832and built a large weatherboard house. By 1839, he had fenced his land with stone walling and built another house, a two-storey house with 8 rooms and outbuildings. In 1940, he bought the Kentish Arms and continued to expand his real estate portfolio. He died in 1880 and by 1885 the original stone house was replaced by these cottages. It is believed that the materials from the original house were used in the construction of the cottages.

Near these two cottages is this building. I found the three different materials used to make this three-in-one type of building intriguing. There’s stone, pressed tin and wood.

Albert Street
I love this awesome perspective example that urban sketchers grapple with on a regular basis. This is the divide between the cottage and three-in-one building.

We also visited the lovely Weaver’s Cottages Studio. They want to stock some of my cards and prints. 😊

Visitors coming into Oatlands from the opposite direction that we entered, are welcomed by cool cow sculptures in Lake Dulverton. May be they are possibly trying to convey that … if you find yourself knee-deep in water, be like the cow and stay calm??? Do you think?? Well, cows used to roam the streets and wander down to the lake to eat the native grasses. Apparently, collecting the family cow from the lake was an after school chore assigned to the children in Oatlands.  https://www.southernmidlands.tas.gov.au/cows-in-lake-sculpture/

Cows wading in Lake Dulverton, Oatlands

Of course, you can’t visit Oatlands and miss the windmill that stands out proud and tall on the landscape.

The windmill
The brand new, soon-to-open Distillery at the windmill site

If you’re driving up the Midland Highway in Tasmania, I recommend that you take the time to turn off and visit enchanting Oatlands.

100 People Challenge

The drawing 100 people in five days challenge has come and gone. I have come close to drawing 100 people in the past but have never quite got over the line. Last year, I didn’t even attempt it and the same almost happened this year. But I attended the Summer Salt Music Festival, in Hobart, Tasmania’s Botanical Gardens https://summersaltmusic.com.au/past-events/hobart/ on Friday, March 12th that coincided with the 100 people challenge. So, while standing in line, I pushed myself to start drawing people. I drew 22 people and then it just got too dark to see. Also, once seated, there were mainly backs of heads to draw, which didn’t inspire me very much.

I won’t bore you with all 22 drawings because frankly most of them are pretty ordinary. I’ve chosen what I think are the best of the lot.

This gothic young woman was sitting fairly close to us. I found her a great person to sketch with her thick, dark long eyelashes, nose ring, lip stud, lacy black top, black skirt and black hat.

At the music festival with the very strict COVID no dancing rule being enforced

I drew her again when she was holding onto her bare foot. Her friend beside her was eating slices of salami,

At the Summer Salt Festival, Hobart, Tasmania
Enjoying the music

The live music was awesome as I hope the start of your week has been.

Many thanks for stopping by and visiting.

Cheers, Patricia (www.pjpaintings.com)

Commissions and Challenges

I’ve finished one commission and I am currently working on another. For the first commission, I was contacted by parents, who wanted an original painting to give to their daughter, at her surprise party, celebrating her graduation from medical school. They requested a sleepy wombat wearing a graduation cap, in a decorated hammock, using safety pins to attach the decorations to the hammock.

the drawing
The painting process has commenced
“Graduation Siesta” finished.

Prints of “Graduation Siesta” have been made as this would be a great gift for anybody graduating/completing any qualification, schooling and/or training. Prints are available at https://pjpaintings.com/collections/wombats/products/copy-of-sleepy-head-series-bunk-beds-wombat-watercolour-1

While I was finishing off this painting, I received a request from somebody who would like to give a friend a painting of her favourite animal …. (I bet you won’t guess what her favourite animal is!!). She has recently left her job as a zookeeper and already has two prints of mine: a wombat and echidnas in hammocks. She wants to make them a feature in the nursery she is setting up, so her friend requested that I paint her favourite animal in a hammock to make it a set of three.

Suspense is over… her favourite animal is the potoroo. I’ve never drawn potoroos. I drew and erased, drew and erased, and drew and erased. I was just about to write an email to say sorry, I can’t draw these little cuties. But something happens when you keep trying and drawing, somehow you start to get to know the curves and proportions in the faces and body and it more or less came together, I think, I hope.

The drawing of potoroos
Adding paint
Adding more paint… and hopefully tomorrow I will be able to add even more paint

Potoroos are a small marsupial. They are a suborder of the kangaroo and wallaby. I’ve seen them in my back yard quite often and most recently while I was walking along the Derwent River in Bellerive, Tasmania, I saw one with its baby in the grass along the side walk. So, so cute!

If you’re looking for a challenge… well here’s one… try drawing and painting these little guy’s noses!

A challenging nose to draw
a closer look at a potoroo’s nose

Thanks for visiting and I hope that life is at a nice level of challenging for you.