Scurry

Day 2 of the Inktober Challenge. The prompt word for today is “scurry”. I associate this word with squirrels, so that’s what I drew. I’ve drawn my squirrels with an Artline pen.

Squirrels

I hope you’re having a great weekend.

Cheers for now, from Patricia (PJ)

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The Inktober Challenge

It’s Day three of the Inktober Challenge and so far I’ve managed to keep up with the pace of producing a drawing a day. For me, it’s about quantity, and quality is secondary with this challenge. What’s important for me is exploring new ideas and being creative. The idea/concept can be refined and reproduced as a quality piece of work later on.

Day #1 – for the prompt word FISH, I drew the critically endangered Tasmanian spotted-handfish

Water coloured inks and watercolour paints were used to paint this picture of the Tasmanian spotted-handfish

Day #2 – for the prompt word WISP, I drew a waft of steam.

A steamy wisp of steam

Day #3 – for the prompt word BULKY, I drew a “bulky” load in a small hammock

ink drawing for the prompt word “bulky”
Bulky painted

Tomorrow’s prompt word is RADIO. Do any ideas come to mind for that word??? I’ll post my drawing for Day #4 – RADIO tomorrow.

Until then, take care and thanks for stopping by.

The Disappearing Emu

Australia’s early settlers hunted emus for food and as a result the emus that were abundant in Tasmania and Australia’s east coast disappeared.  Today, only one population remains in existence, aside from the thriving Australian inland emus, the coastal emu. The New South Wales (NSW) Government, in 2002, listed the coastal emus as an endangered population as its numbers were, and continues to be, in steep decline.

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The coastal emu. Photography by Stephen Otton

The coastal emu is genetically distinct from the inland emu and an important seed disperser. It travels large distances and plays an important role in the regeneration of native species. Other species do a similar service but not to the same capacity. If the coastal emu is lost from the ecosystem it will reduce diversity and populations of species that depend on the plants, not to mention the loss of another emu species.

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The range of the endangered coastal emu population. (Image credit: Coastal Emu Alliance). An estimated 50 Coastal Emus remain in crucial habitat areas of the Clarence and Richmond valleys.

A concerted effort is necessary to save an endangered species with numbers as low as the coastal emu. It is encouraged that sightings of coastal emus and/or nests are reported to The Coastal Emu Register. Identifying nesting sites can help target feral animal control at the local level. Tracking the seasonal movements of the emus, will help build an understanding of the survival rates of adults and chicks, and whether a captive breeding may be required to re-build the number of Coastal Emus found in the wild.

If you are out and about coastal emu spotting, for accuracy sake, please be aware that there are also adventuresome PJ Paintings emus running around.

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Family Outing

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Bonnie and Me!

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Surfing Clifton Beach, Tasmania

Take care and thank you for visiting the unfurling artist. 🙂

PJ Paintings prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

What a Contrast!!!

One good thing that is coming out of the time in Quarantine, is that I’m getting stuck into tidying and re-organising my house – big time!

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Building shelves for my art work-room

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A corner of my art work-room before the tidy-up

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The same corner after the tidy. What a contrast!!

During my intensive tidy up, I have found forgotten and not-forgotten pieces of artwork.

These were forgotten pieces that I painted about five years ago.

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“Heartbroken” – This card is available by emailing pjpaintings@gmail.com

I’ve often wondered why Sympathy cards overwhelmingly picture fields of flowers, a beach or ocean scene, a fence with the sun setting over the hills and the like? These images don’t reflect or acknowledge the pain that many people feel at terrible times in their lives. I understand that the images are trying to help a person to focus on the “the half-full glass” but I sometimes think that an image like “Heartbroken” can help somebody feel that the sender of the card understands the pain and emptiness that they are feeling right now and their immense grief during the early weeks, months, and years they are living with.

I’d be really interested in hearing what you think of this, or am I odd?? Would you send a “Heartbroken” card? Would you like or prefer a card like this over traditional imaged sympathy cards if you suffered a loss? (which I really hope you haven’t or don’t).

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This one I titled “Heartache” and it is also available as a card via pjpaintings@gmail.com

I’ve tried to research this topic but I have found very little about it or explanations about the reason behind the image choices of Sympathy cards. Apparently there are cultural differences with grief. I read an article that has studied differences between how Germany and United States respond to grief. According to this text, American culture encourages people to avoid negative emotions more than the German culture. American expressions of sympathy focus less on the negative and more on the positive than the Germans.

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I named this drawing “Broken Hearted”

I hope that your heart is happy and healthy.

Take care and thank you for visiting, from Pj Paintings

http://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade    pjpaintings@gmail.com

I Spy……. a Bear!

… and a mouse, elephant and moose!

A mass teddy bear hunt is under way around the world to help distract the millions of children locked down because of the coronavirus pandemic. Stuffed toys are being placed in windows to give children a fun and safe activity while walking around neighbourhoods with their parents/carers.

Here’s my contribution to the movement…

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My bear, elephant, mouse and moose collection

The grey, green and cream teddy bears are ones that I made before I knew I liked to paint. The three other bears are from Canada. The mouse I fell in love with in my travels on the mainland of Australia. The moose is from Sweden. My son worked three years in Ethiopia and gave me the handmade knitted elephant from Ethiopia. I also added a painting I did of my handmade Christmas teddy bear.

Another act prompted by the Coronavirus Pandemic is that for the month of April, I’ve removed all shipping costs for website orders made in Australia. I have different sized quality prints, some original paintings, tote bags, zipper pouches and greeting cards available at http://www.pjpaintings.com.

I hope my paintings and the window scene brings a smile to many faces.

Take care and thanks for the visit.

Salamanca Market March 7, 2020

I set up the stall in semi-darkness this morning. On Thursday, when it was raining (the rain is very welcome) I was walking to work at about 6:45 a.m., while it was dark, and my left foot stepped into a massive puddle that I didn’t see. The water went over my entire shoe and I spent the rest of the day squish-squashing every time I took a step.

A couple, whose three children, who now have children of their own, bought three prints to post to two living in Boston, USA, and the other in Toronto, Canada. (They are lamenting that their grandchildren are living on the other side of the earth). They are posting: “Emu Boogie”, “Surfing Clifton Beach, Tasmania” and “Lazy Days” prints.

A framed “Duck Crossing” is going to her first grandchild, one year old, Ava, in Adelaide, SA.  Wendy, affectionately named ‘Wendy Wombat’, after walking the Overland Track about nine years ago, her reactions and love for wombats earned her this name that has stuck over the years. She’s has a lot of wombat pictures and ornaments but she couldn’t resist the Sleepy head wombat series of prints.

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Duck Crossing

A couple, he originally from South Africa and she from Australia, purchased “Christmas Siesta”, “Lost Worlds”and “Rising Above It”.  Actually, about four Christmas Siestas sold today. Another “Rising Above It” was purchased by a young lady from Brazil.

A couple bought a “Glamour Girls” print for her sister who lives in Germany and is a hairdresser. A young Scottish couple, both doctors who have finished one year of working at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and are heading back to Scotland, purchased a “Sea Life” print.

Then I met Arianne from Saint Julienne, Canada.

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Arianne and I at Pj Paintings, site 30, Salamanca Market

Once again, I took the opportunity to try to haul out my French from the crevices of my long-term memory. I told her it was easier to maintain my French speaking skills in Canada, where everything you buy is written in English and French. I used to read the products’ French instructions and blurb daily, which went a long way to helping me retain my French. In Australia, virtually everything is presented only in English. Arianne said I should have my prints’ back information in both French and English, reflect my heritage. I thought this is a great idea and could help people in the same situation as me, trying to keep ourselves from losing our first languages totally. She gave me a little Canadian pin. “What the Devil!?”, “Christmas Siesta” prints and a “Lazy Days” bag are now accompanying her on her travels and adventures.

Canada

While I was packing up three original paintings sold:  “Fancy Pants”, “Walking with Flair”, “Blue Whale”, and earlier in the day, the framed original painting of a blue butterfly sitting on an emu’s beak sold.

The most popular prints today were from the Sleepy Head wombat series

A thought to ponder: “Art is the concrete representation of our most subtle feelings” Agnes Martin

Wishing you a creatively happy upcoming week,

from Pj Paintings, stall #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

P.S. Tote bags, pouches & prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

https://www.facebook.com/pjpaintings/

https://theunfurlingartist.wordpress.com

https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/

pjpaintings@gmail.com

Salamanca Market Feb 22, 2020

We were lucky again today. We had a sunny and windless day. I replaced my 37 kilogram gazebo with a 24 kg one and it was so much easier to set up.

My first visitors to the stall were two from 120 delegates attending a conference in Hobart. They purchased “Bonnie & Me”, “Hayride”and “Outback Glamping” to present to some of the speakers.

I had a lot people from North America visit Pj Paintings today. One lady from California, USA, bought “Red Ute”. She thought her husband would get a kick out of the title.

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Red Ute

A mother and daughter, from the same state, bought a set of Cheer ’em Up cards. Another mother and daughter but from Vermont, USA bought four prints to hang in her bathroom she said: “Family Outing”, “Hayride”, “Joyride” and I can’t remember the fourth.

A couple visiting from Parry Sound, three hours north of Toronto, Canada, living in the bush, purchased “All Ears” from the Cheer ‘em Up series.

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“All Ears” his friend needs a listening ear and even though it’s hard work, and his beak is getting crumpled,  he’s sticking to the task.

A couple from Trail, B.C., Canada, purchased “Double Date”. Another couple visiting from Prince George , B.C., Canada bought “Lazy Days”, “Spiky Bunk Beds”, “Devilish Siesta” and “What the Devil!?” for their four grandchildren. One of their children lives on Vancouver Island, in the same neighbourhood as x-royals Harry and Meghan. Their son has seen them going for walks in the neighbourhood and on trails around his house. He’s told his parents that the community is really good about respecting their privacy.

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What the Devil!?

Girlfriends, visiting from the Gold Coast to attend a country wedding taking place today in Huonville, bought “Allemande Red” for the couple.

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Allemande Red

A couple bought my “Flame Robin” and “Yellow Wattlebird” original paintings. They said that they are going to a Californian retro bungalow in Perth.

A young man, visiting from Japan, bought “Family Outing” and “What the Devil!?” as his Tasmanian souvenir.

The most popular prints today were the wombat prints from the Sleepy Head series, prints from the Cheer ‘em Up series and Hayride.

A thought to ponder: “If I close my eyes, I see things better than with my eyes open.” Henri Matisse    This is true for me too – sometimes!

Wishing you a creatively happy upcoming week,

from Pj Paintings, stall #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

P.S. Tote bags, pouches & prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

https://www.facebook.com/pjpaintings/

https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/

Salamanca Market Feb 1, 2020

On Friday, Hobart got to 40 degrees Celsius. It was hard work packing the car in that heat. The night was hot and uncomfortable, despite some rain falling during the night. Saturday morning, the gazebo was set up in muggy heat but thankfully as the day progressed, a breeze helped to cool things down.

A couple from Launceston, Tasmania, who had “Who, Who, Who are You? II” searched me out to buy more.

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Who, Who, Who are You? II

They arrived with their gorgeous 11 week old St Bernard puppy, named Lady Marmalade. They ended up buying five A-3 sized prints and an A-4 sized print of “Duck Crossing II”.

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eleven week old Lady Marmalade

An x-Tasmanian, now living in Queensland, bought “Hair Accessories” and “Hanging Out”. When she was in Tasmania she took care of Tasmanian Devils and Wombats. In Queensland she looks after Flying Foxes, Kangaroos and Wallabies.

A student, doing his final year of Occupational Therapy in Adelaide, bought a “Bunk Beds” print. A couple from Poland, who spoke very little English, purchased a “Hanging Out” print to take back to Europe with them.

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Bunk beds

A group from Amsterdam purchased “Family Outing” and two young women from France, both bought a “Richmond Bridge, Tasmania” print. A couple from Toronto, Canada purchased a “Salamanca Saturdays” print and a tote bag with the “Hanging Out” image printed on both sides.

A “Lazy Days” zipper pouch and a “Hanging Out” tote bag is travelling to Taiwan. A “Taking a Dip” print is going to be a 30th anniversary gift.

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Taking a Dip

An Orange-bellied parrot and a Flame Robin original painting were purchased. One will be making its home in United States, the other in Hobart.

The most popular prints today were the wombat prints from the Sleepy Head series.

A thought to ponder: “An artist is not paid for his labour but for his vision”. James Whistler.

Wishing you a creatively happy upcoming week,

from Pj Paintings, site #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania

P.S. Tote bags, pouches & prints are available at www.pjpaintings.com

https://www.facebook.com/pjpaintings/

https://www.instagram.com/hopwoodwade/

 

Salamanca Market Jan 18, 2020

Salamanca Market took place under calm skies and moderate temperatures today. There were a lot of international visitors at the PJ Paintings stall today. A German couple are taking a “Sleepy Head” print back to Berlin with them. They said that they like its face and that it looked so relaxed. A “Bunk beds” print’s new residential address is Milan, Italy, and “Who, Who, Who are You? II” and “Fairy Wrens” will be making their home in the Alps in France. Sounds so exotic!

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Sleepy head

 
Two young ladies from Finland bought some A-5 sized prints and greeting cards and then returned later in the day to buy an “Afternoon Siesta” A-4 sized print.

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Afternoon Siesta

A young man bought “Christmas Siesta” to take back to China. A gift for his brother, he said.

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Christmas Siesta

 
A couple originally from South Africa, now living in Adelaide, bought four A-5 sized prints. A lady, from California, USA, bought two medium sized zip pouches, “Lazy Days” and “Afternoon Siesta”. She said that they are great gifts that will easily fit into her suitcase.

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A “Lazy Days” pouch

 
A young Melbornian, who happened to tell a friend she was going to Salamanca Market while in Tasmania, was sent on a mission. Her friend, a Canadian, bought two wombat prints from me two weeks ago at Salamanca Market and she wished she had bought more. When she heard her fried was going to the market, she put in her request for more prints. So, they did FaceTime and she chose two more prints.
 
A young couple, from California, USA, visited the stall in the morning and returned in the afternoon to purchase an original painting of an orca.
June 12 Orca
Another original, titled “Holding Hands” also sold today, purchased by a local Hobartian.

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Holding Hands

A lady from Melbourne purchased an A-3 sized print of “Salamanca Saturdays” and “Afternoon Siesta”. She said they are going straight on the wall.

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Salamanca Saturdays

 
The most popular prints today were the wombat prints from the Sleepy Head series.
 
A thought to ponder: “Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known.” ― Oscar Wilde
 
Wishing everybody a Happy New Year,
from Pj Paintings, stall #30 at Salamanca Market, Tasmania
P.S. Tote bags, pouches & prints are available at http://www.pjpaintings.com

Snowing patterns

‘Pattern’ and ‘snow’ are the prompt words for Day 10 and 11 of the #Inktober2019 Challenge.

I have drawn this emu strutting confidently wearing her patterned coat.

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The Coat of Pattern

For the prompt word ‘snow’ I have taken my inspiration from childhood memories of making snow people. I grew up on the north shore of Vancouver on Seymour Mountain where winter brought snow. In Australia, snow is a novelty and many people have never seen or touched snow but if emus were to experience snow, I’m sure that they would build some snow people.

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Snow!!

Hope all is well in your neck of the woods. Thanks for visiting, PJ Paintings

http://www.pjpaintings.com